Will nylon insert in lock nut stand up to transmission heat?

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  #1  
Old 01-19-18, 01:31 PM
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Will nylon insert in lock nut stand up to transmission heat?

I have a problem with stripped threads for my automatic transmission filter mounting bolt. To make a long story short, I improvised a fix with a couple back up plans which include assorted pieces of hardware. I would like to use a nylon insert lock nut (sometimes referred to as a 'nyloc nut') with the filter mounting bolt or screw. The transmission filter bolts to the valve body.

I'm not sure how much heat is generated by the transmission. I do have a trans fluid cooler. Will the nylon insert in the lock nut stand up to whatever heat the trans puts out?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-19-18, 01:35 PM
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Most likely it will hold up. But instead why not use Loctite (red I think). It's made for high temp and vibration.
 
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Old 01-19-18, 01:42 PM
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You mean put a little Loctite on the Allen stud threads where the nyloc nut screws on?
 
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Old 01-19-18, 01:51 PM
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No! Just the Loctite with a normal nut is all that should be necessary. The proper Loctite is used in industry on machinery that cannot tolerate an fasteners getting loose.

You have two choices. Thread lock Blue 242...use hand tools to remove

Or

Thread Loc Red 271...Use heat and heavy duty tools to remove.

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/produ...ndex.pl/3/2/21
 
  #5  
Old 01-19-18, 02:09 PM
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I see. Another variation on my fix. Cool.

I also heard of people using nail polish remover to dissolve permanent thread locker
 
  #6  
Old 01-19-18, 04:45 PM
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I had trouble finding a reference but there are other types of self locking nuts. I'm most familiar with the ones that have a detente marking on 3 of the six sides. Here is a link that discusses some.
https://www.aspenfasteners.com/v/vsp...knut_specs.pdf

These are self locking but do not have the nylon.

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 01-19-18, 05:21 PM
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I would suggest using the high strength (red) Loctite on the studs and then one of several options for either a thin jamb nut on top of the primary nut or one of the self-locking nuts shown on this page. https://www.boltdepot.com/Nuts.aspx?nv=l
 
  #8  
Old 01-19-18, 06:08 PM
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Don't know if it affects the locking ability of whatever lock nut I use. But the nut will always be tightened upward when installing new trans fluid filters.

These are great links you guys included with pictures and description. I was thinking of using a nut/lock washer combo. But with all the choices, separate lock washer doesn't seem necessary.

Are the vast majority of lock nut styles reversible so nut can be backed off stud later?
 
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Old 01-20-18, 05:53 AM
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Yes, but they will not be as effective the next time. This includes the Nylock and some of the others that Bud9051 mentioned.
 
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Old 01-21-18, 07:04 PM
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Ok. Thanks. I don't think I will use the nylock type for this particular application. But I already purchased a few. So I am sure they will come in handy for something else in the future.
 
  #11  
Old 01-27-18, 10:51 AM
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I'll probably use serrated flange lock nut or flange nut with locking star washer. Less wear and tear on stud threads. And flange seats on wider area. Picture below.

How do I orient locking side of star washer,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,facing nut flange or facing trans fluid filter base?

Nut and stud mounted upside down. So nut will be screwed on upwards.
 
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  #12  
Old 01-27-18, 11:25 AM
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Makes no difference. Flip the lock washer over and the "teeth" are still oriented the same way. They are designed to prevent loosening. so they "dig in" when tightened CW and resist CCW movement. The nut can be replaced, but what will the other side of the washer be in contact with? If it's a soft material, I wouldn't use the star washer unless you also use a flat washer. ie: filter(?)-flat washer-star washer-flange nut.

The locktite would be much easier.....
 
  #13  
Old 01-27-18, 11:37 AM
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One side of the star lock washer does look a little different in that the teeth are more raised and flared than the other side.

The other side of the star washer would be in contact with the metal base of the filter around the bolt hole. Maybe not an issue since the metal seems hard enough. Or I could use a flat washer. But I have several hardware options on hand to choose from including loctite.

If I have any trouble backing out the current bolt from the stripped thread hole, any tips on that? Do I wiggle the bolt...alternately reverse direction,,,screw in,,,,,back out?
 

Last edited by bluesbreaker; 01-27-18 at 12:14 PM.
  #14  
Old 02-27-18, 02:57 PM
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I finally got this done today. I ended up using an Allen stud and a serrated flange lock nut. The lock nut wouldn't tighten very well because the washer underneath must have been rotating with it. So I used thread locker blue. I also used thread locker on the Allen stud since that will remain bolted in permanently.

Later on it occurred to me that I could have applied thread locker or epoxy to the washer to keep it from rotating.

I'll refill with transmission fluid tomorrow. I want to give time for the thread locker to cure overnight. Is it ok if I push my truck into the garage with no trans fluid in neutral?
 

Last edited by bluesbreaker; 02-27-18 at 03:33 PM.
  #15  
Old 02-27-18, 05:20 PM
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I wouldn't be hesitant to push it inside without fluid. Thread lock won't do it, but I wouldn't epoxy the lock washer in place either. Are you sure that the stud wasn't turning? Or that it wasn't crushing a bit into the housing? Or that the threads weren't stripping? Regardless, sounds like you were pretty thorough, so I suspect that you're in good shape.
 
  #16  
Old 02-27-18, 06:34 PM
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The stud I used bit into the threads pretty solid and tight. But I didn't force it either. I don't think the stud was moving any more after I mounted it because I tried to turn it a little more with the Allen wrench. It was a standard smooth washer under the serrated locknut. So I tend to think the washer was rotating a little under the nut.

I used a smooth washer because I wanted the serrations on the nut to have a good surface to 'bite' into. I also inserted a copper wire strand or two with the stud to help it seat.

It was hard to decide which option was the best, since there are several ways to improvise a fix on this.

Maybe I should have used a lock washer under the lock nut. When I change the fluid again in late 2019, I might tap the threads for a larger 5/16 stud with epoxy. It should be fine till then.

I'll push the truck into the garage. Thanks
 
  #17  
Old 02-28-18, 04:15 PM
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....................Runs fine. Done.
 
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