first time rear brake replacement

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-30-18, 06:00 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: usa
Posts: 69
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
first time rear brake replacement

Hello
I changed the rear pads, rotors and calipers in 2000 silverado. This is the first time I ever did this task myself/ DIY. Everything seems OK after the repair, no brake lights, no squeaking, etc. The pedal feels different but I assume that will change once its breaks in. It was a pleasure to drive without grinding noises for the first time in awhile.

Anyway, how do I truly know that the breaks are working? Since the front brakes do most of the works, I would be stopping even if the backs werent working. I did touch the new rotors after my test drive and they were hot.... thats the only test I can think of!! I didnt think to depress the pedal with the tires off and still jacked up.... I put the tires on immediately and fired it up!

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-30-18, 06:06 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 58,466
Received 1,027 Votes on 953 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

You changed the calipers too ?
That would mean you had to bleed the air out of the rear lines and calipers.
Allow plenty of fluid to flush thru the lines. On an older vehicle it's important to purge the lines of old fluid and water.
 
  #3  
Old 04-30-18, 06:17 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: usa
Posts: 69
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The calipers got changed, the pistons were frozen and the bleeders were stripped.

I did not bleed them though, I quickly removed the brake line and reattached. Barely any fluid came out from the line as I had the cap on the cylinder.

I planned to do a complete flush at a later day and needed to get back on the road.

Am I asking for trouble?
 
  #4  
Old 04-30-18, 08:46 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 473
Received 19 Votes on 17 Posts
Um, if I'm understanding you correctly, you bought new calipers (that are empty of fluid) and attached them really quickly to your brake lines (after you dc'd your old calipers)?

My guess then you had to pump the brakes a lot and add fluid in order to fill the calipers and compress the air that is trapped in them. This should result in a very mushy pedal and significant loss of braking power. It should be very noticeable. You should have a solid pedal feeling.

Very unsafe. On some braking systems, the compressed air will push fluid back into the lines which will result in no brakes at a most inopportune time!

I'm surprised you didn't say to yourself something is wrong. Unless there is something you left out of your operation?

Edit: Rotors will get hot to the touch just by friction from the turning wheel. Hot rotors to the touch mean very little. Our tolerance for heat is very low compared the heat range of a rotor.
 
  #5  
Old 05-01-18, 04:35 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,000
Received 70 Votes on 63 Posts
I was a brake mechanic for many years, The easiest way I found to bleed brakes was to open the bleed screw and gravity bleed till clean fluid came out Take top off MC and a must is to keep adding fluid . DO NOT LET MC GET EMPTY It will take 5 to 10 minutes at each wheel. Even if you did not work on front bleed them also. The last thing is to close all bleed screws and pump brakes. Go around each wheel and open bleed screw. you will see a air bubble come out.
Very dangerous to drive without bleeding.
 
  #6  
Old 05-01-18, 06:25 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: usa
Posts: 69
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Im fortunate you reminded me. I bled them this morning and their is a significant difference in firmness. duh! Now which one of you want to go on a ride on the expressway with me?
 
  #7  
Old 05-01-18, 11:52 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 58,466
Received 1,027 Votes on 953 Posts
No problem..... I'll ride shotgun with ya'
Come pick me up.
 
  #8  
Old 05-01-18, 08:18 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 911
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
FWIW the only way I've ever been able to successfully change/flush fluid is by using a Motive bleeder.
No need to deal with the MC, just hook it up to your reservoir and pump fluid through.
Anytime the brake lines have been open, even briefly, air has entered the system and the only way to get it out was the Motive bleeder.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: