Possible to transport a 107" chopper in a 97" pickup?

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  #1  
Old 05-09-18, 03:44 PM
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Possible to transport a 107" chopper in a 97" pickup?

With the tailgate down the bed length of the pickup is 97".
The wheelbase of the chopper is 84" and the overall length is 107" which means there's about 12" of length beyond the wheelbase on each end.
This puts the center of the rear wheel just beyond the edge of the tailgate.
Would using a Jack in order to put the weight on the frame instead of the rear wheel or setting it on a 107" 2x12 work? If no one's successfully used either of those methods, is there another way? I don't want to buy a trailer because I don't have room to store it.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 04:01 PM
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Can you put the bike in at an angle?

I would also consider blocking under the bike so you can strap it down hard on the frame. If it's on it's wheels you have the suspension travel and tire squish to contend with which can allow things to shift or straps to loosen.
 
  #3  
Old 05-09-18, 05:00 PM
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Actually disregard, my earlier post has to be the stupidest ever.
I wouldn't be able to get the bike on a 2x12 and since the weight on a chopper is towards the rear, a Jack would be pretty much on the tailgate anyway.
Anyway so revise it to ask if there's a way to haul this.
Diagonally would be great but I've never been able to get a 500lb sportbike diagonally (and then taking it back out) in that truck so - maybe there's a better/easier way to get it diagonally?
 
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Old 05-09-18, 07:13 PM
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Are you going to be doing this regularly or is it a one time trip?
 
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Old 05-09-18, 07:26 PM
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would be a one time trip.
I have a bike tower that will do it for $225 but since the seller wants cash I'll have to ride down with the tower anyway so I'm trying to see if I can not only save the $225 in towing but also coordinate two people's schedules instead of three people's schedules
 
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Old 05-09-18, 10:58 PM
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I'd rent a trailer for $20 a day.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 05:15 AM
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Yea, if this is only a one time deal I would rent or borrow a trailer or box truck.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 06:34 AM
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Check this out:

https://www.uhaul.com/ReservationsMvc/RatesTrailers

Scroll down to 5x9 utility trailer with ramp.
 
  #9  
Old 05-10-18, 02:10 PM
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Eh, 500 lbs bike?
Buy a couple burgers and a case of beer.
Get 5-6 neighbors to pick it up and put it in the truck, heavy-end first.

Heck, I've loaded a 600 lbs+ simplicity lawn tractor into a standard bed pickup truck
using a tow strap, a hand winch, a floor jack, and 1n-law.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 03:07 PM
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They also rent M/C trailers cheaper than regular open trailers. Would have to verify the max length.

Unless you can beg borrow or steal someones trailer for free, why risk any damage or make it more difficult. Rent...
 
  #11  
Old 05-10-18, 03:22 PM
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I'm thinking trailer or box truck is the way to go, thank you
 
  #12  
Old 05-11-18, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelChang
Possible to transport a 107" chopper in a 97" pickup?


Yes.

A standard width bed pickup is ~116" long, measured along the diagonal.
The narrower box bed is ~108" long, diagonal..
 
  #13  
Old 05-12-18, 10:14 AM
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No way I get that puppy diagonal. It's not so much the weight but the length. Even a sportbike with a much shorter overall length is a nightmare.

So I'm mentally prepared to rent a trailer, drive it down, and load the chopper onto the trailer.
My fear is ratcheting straps coming loose.
This has happened to me twice before (albeit the same brand/strap set) and yes, I did put it in the locked position.

Is there a good strong type of grippy rope that I can use as a backup that'll tie securely (the nylon one's I feel are too slippery) so that if a strap loosens, that backup rope at least prevents the thing from keeling over? At least until my next rest then I can re-secure the ratcheting strap
 
  #14  
Old 05-12-18, 10:49 AM
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I've strapped MC's to trailers several times and my experience is that you get what you pay for when buying ratchet straps.

I would not trust my bike to those $12 packs of 4 straps - way too cheap. Years ago I bought high quality straps for $12 each or so and I still have them. Get good quality ratchet straps and you won't have a problem.

You'll probably only need 4 to tie down a bike - two front, two rear. Then use your cheaper straps as backups.

Good luck!
 
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Old 05-12-18, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by MichaelChang
(the nylon one's I feel are too slippery)
The trick to using slippery rope is to use a surgeon's loop in the center, then overhand loops at the ends, and then snug them up with a windlass.

Assuming about 20' of rope =- take the center of rope, wrap it around the top of the forks twice.
Tighten the wrap around the forks, , take out all the slack and keeping both strands snug against the forks with left hand, then flip a 6" loop and hold that with the left thumb. Pull the rest of the rope through the loop twice (basically a double shoelace knot without the bot) and snug everything up. You should now have a "surgeon's loop" around the forks, a knot that won't loosen, even with slick rope..

Take one strand for left side of the bed, one strand for the right, loop both through the bed-post holes once or twice, then snug up. Bring both leads back to center, loop around the top of the forks again and snug up. Finish by making overhand loops at each end of the rope, slide them over the opposite handle bar, then snut up the knots. Even with a slippery rope, the knots won't move.


If you're still worried, grab two wooden brooms.
Stick one broom handle between the 2 ropes on the left side, the other broom between the 2 ropes on the other side. Twist the the broom handle up towards the cab to twist the ropes tighter, slide the broom handle back, twist again. When it's good and tight, pull the handle back towards the tailgate so the bristles/head are up against the rope- the broom handle should now be locked in place and held tight against the bed of the truck by the tension.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 05-12-18 at 03:14 PM.
  #16  
Old 06-22-18, 08:11 AM
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I ended up paying a motorcycle hauler $225 to haul it, certainly not in the spirit of DIY but I didn't want to take a chance
 
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