LED Trailer Lights

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  #1  
Old 05-02-19, 04:50 AM
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LED Trailer Lights

Does anyone know why my new led trailer light indicator is flashing too quickly?

I replaced the old trailer bulb lamps with LED ones to save the environment and all that.
But now it's flashing too quickly!!

Doing a bit of online research it seems that there could be a problem with a "Resistor".
But I can't get my head around it.

The old indicator was working fine.
Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Scatman

 
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Old 05-02-19, 05:18 AM
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I bet it's the flasher module in the towing vehicle. Probably an older vehicle that requires the higher current draw of incandescent lights to make the flasher work at the proper speed. More modern vehicles are designed to work with LED's and don't have this issue.
 
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Old 05-02-19, 05:39 AM
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I would try a new flasher first too. Pretty inexpensive and, as mentioned, not uncommon on older vehicles. If not that, I would check that the ground is good, all the way from the tow vehicle to each of the taillights.
 
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Old 05-03-19, 05:10 AM
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The resistance of LED lamps is less than incandescent bulbs. In a circuit, decreasing the resistance results in a current increase. My guess is your flasher control operates on heating and the increased current (increased heat) is causing the on/off circuit to increase in frequency. The solution is to add resistance to the circuit by adding resistors in the +vdc wires going to the LED lamps to reduce current. However finding a place to disconnect the wire and add a resistor is not an easy task. You will also probably need to try a few different resistor values to find one that results in the on/off frequency you like. As suggested earlier, I would see if there is a flasher made for your vehicle that drives LED lamps and whatever type the vehicle has before considering adding resistors.
 
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Old 05-03-19, 09:11 AM
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You're close. The flashers do work on heating but it needs more heat to operate slower. The old style flashers were designed to work with a specific quantity of incandescent bulbs. This was done so you knew when a bulb burned out. The remaining ones and the dash indicator would flash quickly.

There are many electronic replacement flashers available that don't require a set circuit load.
Electronic flasher
 
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Old 05-09-19, 02:53 AM
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Thanks for all the help & feedback. Much appreciated!

Pilot Dane, where is the flasher unit located?
If it's a cheap fix it would be great.

The lamp I bought was a LED Autolamps - Trailer Lamps Kit (100 Series).
You can see it here: https://www.truckelectrics.com/colle...trailer-lights

LED Autolamps is a decent brand. That's why I went for it, so the problem must lie elsewhere.
I
f i can just fix out that 'flasher unit' it would be great.

Thanks,

Scatman
 
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Old 05-09-19, 04:57 AM
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You haven't even told us what vehicle you have. How are we supposed to know where a small electrical component is located? Try finding the service manual or searching online for information about your vehicle.
 
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Old 05-09-19, 05:05 AM
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As mentioned, its going to depend on the vehicle, but on older vehicles it was commonly under the dash, and if you turn your turn signals on you may hear it clicking, which will help you pin it down. If your fuse box is in the side panel below the glove box, It might be located there. If a newer vehicle it is likely located near the fuse panel under the hood.
 
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Old 05-09-19, 05:58 AM
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I'm confused. I would understand if he changed the vehicle lights to LED but he put these new ones on a trailer.

This sounds like you have to change the flasher if you hook up a trailer?
 
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Old 05-09-19, 03:47 PM
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Except when the trailer has a break away battery for the brakes, which is separate from and unrelated to the lights, a trailer has no battery and no charging system of its' own, so when it is connected it becomes part of the tow vehicle. So yes, certain elements of the electrical system on the tow vehicle, including the flasher, can be affected by a trailer.
 
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