oxgygen sensor Ranger

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Old 01-26-21, 09:18 PM
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oxgygen sensor Ranger

Check engine light went on. Inexpensive code reader I borrowed indicated code for O2 sensor. Discovered there are actually two separate O2 sensors on the vehicle ('98 Ford Ranger 2.5cc 4- cylinder), an upstream and a downstream. (Was told that auto shops have more precise readers that can indicate which of the two is bad and needs replacement.) So, for my do-it-yourself purposes was thinking of just buying two, replacing one, and seeing if that solves the problem, and if not then replacing the other one also. Apparently there is some difference between the upstream or downstream part, they are apparently not identical. However I am also suspecting that perhaps they are indeed identical enough on this vehicle that if you just get two of the same such as shown in this link, that it can fit/work fine regardless of whether installed upstream or downstream: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...A1TU3M7A7X0HKF
Any comments appreciated.

Edit: Actually after watching some youtube as to what replacement of one, or two, of these things will likely entail for my truck, I'm figuring it would be worth my while instead to just take it to a reputable shop and have them do it.
 
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Old 01-27-21, 10:17 AM
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generally the code tells you what bank and sensor it is will say bank 1 or 2 and sensor 1 and 2, bank 1 is the exhaust bank on number 1 cylinder, sensor 1 is upstream, sensor 2 is usually down stream if there is only 2.
an inexpensive code reader will generally give you this info so you know what sensor is throwing the code.
if the connectors are the same the only difference is often wiring length.
 
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Old 01-27-21, 10:20 AM
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With the age of the vehicle.... they can be a little tough to get out.
 
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Old 01-29-21, 12:31 AM
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Update: An interesting/fortunate turn of events. I called a reputable auto repair shop where I have done business before, and explained to them how the borrowed inexpensive code reader indicated the O2 sensor, but not the specific one of the two. He said bring it by he'll check it for free with his more precise reader. It turned out to be the upstream sensor. He said what they usually do (and what I did not do) is clear the code after it's first indicated, then see if the check engine light and the code is re-indicated again after the car is re-started again and the customer drives a while, that sometimes if you're lucky it's just kind of a glitch and the problem goes away. So he cleared the code, we re-started the truck, I've been driving around all day and the check engine light has stayed off! A lucky break for me this time I think; I've got my fingers crossed that's the end of the problem.
 
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Old 01-29-21, 07:37 AM
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If high miles 02 sensor should be replaced. Very important sensor in fuel economy. The garage must not be that reputable. Just clear code no preliminary testing just clear code drive and hope it doesn't come back just a glitch? Depending on code some knowledge labscope testing. 02 get lazy. Chances are it will come back. If high mileage why not replace with oe. Save on gas. Gas is not cheap.
 
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