What type of paint over rust and bare metal?


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Old 12-09-21, 07:20 PM
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What type of paint over rust and bare metal?

I'm having a couple areas repaired on the frame of my 2004 Toyota Tundra, and would like the shop to apply some sort of paint or sealer to the repaired areas as well as the other areas they clean up. They recommended using POR15, but I'm concerned it won't cure properly because daytime temperatures are only around 40 right now. Also, I read that once POR15 is applied, subsequent welding repairs can be very nasty, messy, and toxic. Is there another type of spray paint that is sufficient to use on bare metal and surface rust that will offer some protection?
 
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Old 12-09-21, 10:57 PM
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Nope. The rust needs to be removed as much as possible and then anything remaining hit with a converter. Usually, oil based primer is called for over the converter and then any paint and clear coat over that.
 
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Old 12-09-21, 11:19 PM
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The shop knows what they are talking about. Por 15 is the right material to use for auto applications, not only does it have rust inhibitors built into the paint it's a hard barrier to the elements.

I've used this on many applications and it works as advertised.

​​​​​​​
POR-15 Rust Preventive Coating REALLY Stops Rust Permanently! ... It dries to a rock-hard, non-porous finish that won't chip, crack, or peel, and it prevents rust from recurring by protecting metal from further exposure to moisture. Provides rust protection with a hammer-tough finish.
 
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Old 12-10-21, 05:00 AM
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I read that once POR15 is applied, subsequent welding repairs can be very nasty, messy, and toxic
The repairs have been made, do you really anticipate more welding
 
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Old 12-10-21, 05:41 AM
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I'm not questioning whether POR-15 is the right product for the job. I'm questioning whether I should hold off for now because daytime highs are in the low 40s and the stuff needs to cure between 50 and 90. Also, to do it properly, the degreaser and metal etch product should be used prior to applying the paint, correct? It sounds like they're just going to brush it on with no prep.

I plan on having the frame treated at some point. In the meantime, is there a spray paint they can use where the repairs were made that will protect the new metal and any bare areas they clean?

Two areas of the frame caused it to fail inspection, so I'm repairing just those two areas for now, which is why I mentioned the possibility of needing additional work in the future. I really only need to get a few more years out of it before I sell it.
 
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Old 12-10-21, 06:18 AM
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So if it's being repaired in a shop then wouldn't it be done inside?

I dont think I would worry too much about the temps, the material is petroleum based, it's a pain to clean, so cooler temps will not cause it to fail. If it were below freezing that might be another story.

Plus anything else you add is going to experience the same conditions!
 
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Old 12-10-21, 06:47 AM
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With most solvent based coatings cool or damp conditions will slow down the drying time, at or near freezing can stop the drying process but it will resume when as it warms back up.
 
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Old 12-11-21, 06:41 PM
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Nighttime temps are in the 20s so I'm going to hold off. What type of spray paint should I apply to the bare metal to get me through the winter?
 
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Old 12-12-21, 01:02 AM
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The shop is going to keep the vehicle inside - I'd have them do the work now.
 
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Old 12-12-21, 06:20 AM
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And, what ever you put on there should be removed.

So as we have all stated, pull the truck in a garage, set up a some heat over night to warm up the truck, keep the material in the house and just get it done with!
 
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Old 12-14-21, 04:35 AM
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This isn't a body shop that is doing the work. They are welders that also work on cars. My concern is they will not follow the proper procedure for the application of the POR (degreaser, etch, paint). Guess I'll call them and have a chat.
 
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Old 12-14-21, 06:03 PM
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Marq1, Reading with interest about the advertising on the POR 15. My next project is some pretty deep surface rust on the outer Rear Fender of my Chrysler 300. Is this product something I could put on after an aggressive rust removing grinding, sanding Instead of cutting out the two sections and re welding metal pieces in place of the rusted out areas? I would think I would have to put regular primer. base/clear to match things up on top of whatever I use for this over the POR 15, if you think that would work.
 
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Old 12-15-21, 12:03 AM
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deep surface rust on the outer Rear Fender
​​​​​​​grinding, sanding Instead of cutting out the two sections and re welding metal pieces in place
POR materials are used for rust prevention/encapsulation, it doesn't do anything to repair/replace rusted metal so if the metal is gone it's not going to help.

Plus it's not a good material to use on exterior panels because it doesn't have the ability to flow out (brush applied) where a top coat would be applied. For an exterior painted panel an automotive epoxy primer would be a better choice!
 
 

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