steel to cast iron soil pipe transition joint?

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Old 09-27-02, 05:14 AM
warnerms
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steel to cast iron soil pipe transition joint?

I'm replacing a steel drain pipe that runs
into the hub of a horizontal cast iron pipe.
The seal was poured lead and Oakum which
I have removed.

What other ways are there to seal the
new steel pipe into the cast iron pipe hub
without melting lead. What is the procedure
for using lead wool? Do I use loose wool or
the rope type? Do I still need to first pack
with oakum? What tool is used to pack the wool?
If the rope type is best, where do I get it?
I tried using a Fernco neoprene compression
donut P22U-139, but it was just too loose in the hub.
 
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Old 09-27-02, 05:32 AM
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I have used rubber transition gaskets that do the right job. Can't think of brand name right now. You just need to know the inside diameter of the hub you are using. (regular, heavy, extra-heavy CI all have different sizes)

Lead wool is used primarily on existing lead joints where leaks are.
 
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Old 09-28-02, 03:57 AM
warnerms
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Not the answer I was looking for. I have already tried that approach, which would work fine for newer cast iron pipe. This is an old pipe and hence the inside diameter is, after 50 or so years,a little larger after wire brushing out the rust. The pipe was previously inspected and is still serviceable but the rubber donut approach is just not going to work. The pipe projects out of a concrete slab, so I can not just saw off the
hub and use a hubless coupler. So we're back to
Oakum and cold working lead wool. Just need to know the general procedure, thats all.
Any plumbing pros here?
 
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Old 09-28-02, 04:49 AM
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Notuboo is a pro plumber on here, as are a few others on here.

You will never get a solid seal by using lead wool, and if you got it tight enough it will leak in the future

The bushing Notuboo talks about is called EZ Tight Soil Gasket, I used one not to long ago to go from ABS to 4"cast hub.

You must have got a wrong size, cause, the one I used took a slug hammer just to force the seal the pipe into the hub.

Horizontally, does it pass to the outside of the foundation? if so dig it out, cut the pipe and make the transition there using a fernco coupling.
 
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Old 09-29-02, 10:58 AM
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if you are going to caulk the joint you will need to pack it with oakum to 1" below the top of the hub. Then the best way is to pour in melted led from a ladle to fill the hub. After the lead cools and solidifies pack it in with a packing iron (the lead shrinks as it cools). There are other products made to replace the lead. If you can't find anything then mix some water plug and pack it with that. The oakum makes the joint watertight, the lead is to stabalize the joint.
 
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Old 09-29-02, 12:01 PM
tedn333
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For Plumber2000: Thought I saw on a reply awhile back that Ferncos weren't to be used for underground applications. Am I mistaken? Thanks, and sorry to bother but it had me worried.
 
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Old 09-29-02, 12:09 PM
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There used all the time, you find them at the city taps, code says there allowed.

Made a few city connections with fernco's and no problem with the inspectors.
 
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Old 09-29-02, 02:37 PM
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Not allowed in several areas I work. Some codes have been altered to disallow them.

Best bet, check with local inspector before you start.
 
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Old 09-29-02, 03:00 PM
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Where warnerms lives in Seattle, I believe his state and mine here in Oregon use UPC with state admendments, more then likely it will be allowed.

But yes should check code in the area.

Paulypfunk another plumber on here which lives there would know for sure
 
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Old 09-29-02, 03:36 PM
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Plumber 2000, just for the sake of asking...

How many plumbing codes do you have to follow where you are at? My work stradles a state line (2 states), most work in 4 county area, and 12 cities. Have gone to basically 2 codes (IPC and UPC) but at least 8 variants with local alterations. YA, I get confused from time to time...

Don't even want to know about other building codes...
 
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Old 09-29-02, 03:55 PM
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The Code here is 2000 edition of Oregon Plumbing Specialty Code (1997 Uniform Plumbing Code with Oregon amendments),

This is the main code we follow.

Washington and Idaho use the same code with there admendments.

I can use my license to do work in Wa or Id without having to take the license test

Nice not to have to use so many books, to bad there is not one set standardized version all states would follow, but I don't see that happening anytime in the future.
 
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