Replacing Main Water Supply Line

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  #1  
Old 10-14-02, 09:49 AM
T_Lesniak
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Replacing Main Water Supply Line

I just found I have a leak in the main water supply line in my front yard. I've decided to tackle it myself and would like any, and all, information I can secure about the best way of going at it. I want to replace the entire line from main box to the house, in 3/4 " Copper line. I had a leak repaired in this line 3 years ago.

My major concerns are as follows:

1. What should I do to make sure that when the job is done and settlement of the ground occurs I don't create another leak ?

2. Is there a need for me to build a rock bed beneath the copper line for support?

3. Is there something I should add to the each end of the line to allow it to flex with the settlement of the ground?

4. What is the easiest way to burrow under the sidewalk to pass the copper line thru?

Thanks for your help on this project.

T_Lesniak
 
  #2  
Old 10-14-02, 02:58 PM
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1. What should I do to make sure that when the job is done and settlement of the ground occurs I don't create another leak ?


Make sure the pipe is setting on firm ground.


2. Is there a need for me to build a rock bed beneath the copper line for support?


If you sit the pipe on firm ground no need for rock bed, soft copper flexes pretty good.

3. Is there something I should add to the each end of the line to allow it to flex with the settlement of the ground?


Once again if it sits firm on ground, nothing will be needed.


4. What is the easiest way to burrow under the sidewalk to pass the copper line thru?


After you cut the existing pipe on both side of the sidewalk, with two people, you can rotate the pipe in circles, this will allow the pipe to expand the existing hole wider, allowing you to string the new line under it, once you pull the old line out from under the sidewalk.

Let us know how the project turns out.

Ron
 
  #3  
Old 10-14-02, 07:10 PM
T_Lesniak
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I'll let you know how it turns out.

Thanks -

T_Lesniak
 
  #4  
Old 10-14-02, 07:24 PM
chukmac
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main line

Don't know if it is really necessary, but where I live-and worked until I retired- copper lines had to be bedded in sand underneath- up to 4"- and 2/3 way up pipe sides. If you have problems getting under walk, assemble a pvc pipe to fit on your water hose, and with a copper nozzle (one that looks like the one on a fire hose) on the other end of the pipe. with this and different lengths of pipe, you can easily go under walks, driveways,etc.
Hope this is of some help.
chuck
 
  #5  
Old 10-15-02, 01:59 AM
plumbguy
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I sense busted gas mains, phone lines, cable lines,water mains
and what ever else someone who has no business doing this kind of work. All of your questions tell me you dont have a clue..
 
  #6  
Old 10-15-02, 07:56 AM
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plumbguy,

Thats why they call this doityourself.com, so they can get clues.
 
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Old 10-15-02, 11:18 AM
plumbguy
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I just got a little fired up..
 
  #8  
Old 10-15-02, 11:27 AM
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No Problem


Good to see you around, been awhile since you been in here.
 
  #9  
Old 10-15-02, 11:33 AM
T_Lesniak
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Plumbguy - How about some tips for someone who might be "clueless" ??

Your advise may be better received than you think.

T
 
  #10  
Old 10-15-02, 10:30 PM
plumbguy
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Rocks will rub a hole in copper, clean dirt only..
Use a trencher for the trench, and a trenching spoon to clean the ditch of any debree after trenching. I like to replace the service line all the way up to the meter nipple itself. Also call and get the utilities located. If any are in the way hand dig to find them . Im not sure what the soil is like there but as long as the copper line is laying on a somewhat flat clean surface with no sharp peaks on the ditch floor you can proceed, when you back fill just shovel it in and walk it down, you can rake all the dirt over the ditch like a mound and it will settle level, just be sure to replace all the dirt.
also return all the copper ends to full bore to prevent turbulence
that will create friction loss. also if you install anykind of gate valve or ball valve be sure it is fullport. If the line is over 100' and the street pressure is at least 100 psi one inch will be good, if the street pressure is belowe 90 psi go with 3/4, if its only 60 feet 3/4 will be great. the same applies if the run is shorter as well.
I hope this helps, there is a hell of alot more I could say but it would look like a novel.




"Good to talk to you to Plumber 2000"
 
  #11  
Old 10-16-02, 06:05 AM
T_Lesniak
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Plumbguy

Thank for your help!!
 
  #12  
Old 10-17-02, 01:55 PM
H
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new service line

He's right about the size of the service line, replace what you have with the same size line if you're happy with your water pressure - If you're not happy with your water pressure and your house is more than 100 feet from the watermain in the street use a larger line because it may help. (If you're only 50 feet from the watermain and you don't lioke your pressure, call the water company!) Lay the service line directly on good dirt in the bottom of the trench, but RESIST THE URGE TO STRAIGHTEN THE COPPER OUT COMPLETELY. let it wander back and forth in the ditch. This will ensure that there is enough slack in the line and then if the ground settles a bit it won't hurty the line where it connects. You'll have to call the Utility Company to shut off your water at the street too. We don't really like customers to operate the curb shutoff valves on their own.

With regard to using a trencher/ditchwitch, if you experience cold winters where you are, be sure to get a minimum of 3 feet of cover over your water servie, otherwise you'll run the risk of freezing it.

Good Luck!
 
  #13  
Old 10-17-02, 06:05 PM
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Code dictates the size of the service, there are formula's and flow charts one follows that detemined the size to be installed.

Number of fiture units, pressure at the meter, elevations up or down hill of the meter, distance to highest fixture in house, designed working pressure.

All this will let you know exactly what size of run is needed from the meter to the house.

So guessing on ther size related to the distance between meter and house, is not how you tell what size.

If the pressure has been ok in the past on an existing line, stay with the size of line, unless the line happens to be 1/2", then code specifies service will be a min of 3/4"
 
  #14  
Old 10-18-02, 09:31 AM
H
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You are right, there are published tables that show exactly how to size the line. (Although I never heard of the code limiting the size of the line, only stating what the minimum size can be.)

But...

Since the average guy doesn't own a plumbing book or have another source for that information about sizing the service line, I made the generalization about the pressure and the sizing of the line. Just a quick rule of thumb that the average homeowner can go by.
 
 

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