Baking Soda & Vinegar?

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Old 11-23-02, 02:50 PM
magister
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Baking Soda & Vinegar?

I've read reference to baking soda and vinegar on this forum; I had a rocket which was propelled by this mixture when I was a kid, but I'm unsure of it's use in plumbing.

Is the mixture corrosive to a clog or would it possibly propel the clog as it did my rocket, breaking it up as it goes?
 
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Old 11-23-02, 05:34 PM
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It depends on type of clog, how severe and location, personnaly, I'm not a chemist, but are you asking if, is it possible to remove a clog in a drain by apply'ing a chemical bass type of pressure?

What are you wanting to do?
 
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Old 11-23-02, 05:49 PM
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Clogged drains

One simple method for clearing small clogs is to use baking soda and vinegar. Empty one-half cup baking soda down the drain, followed by one-half cup white vinegar. Cover the drain and let mixture stand for a few minutes. Then pour a pot of boiling water down the drain. The baking soda and vinegar dissolve fatty acids, allowing the clog to wash down the drain.

If you feel you need to buy a drain cleaner, the enzyme cleaners are a natural and nonchemical way to unclog drains. Enzymes eat and break down any organic matter. Using enzyme drain cleaners once a month, such as Bi-O-Kleen's Bacout, will help not just your drains, but your septic system. They will also significantly reduce odor from garbage disposals. Colonies of enzymes will actually continue to grow and break down organic matter in your drains .

Clearing Clogged Drains More Cleaning Solutions
by Annie Berthold-Bond, Care2.com Producer, Green Living Channels. Retrieved 23 November 2002. http://www.care2.com/channels/solutions/home/210
 
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Old 11-23-02, 07:08 PM
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magister,

We really need a few specifics to help you out. Because of what you posted, I would assume that you have a clogged drain of some sort. That could be anything from one lavy that is slow to the entire house being backed up with 6" of water in the tub you can't get rid of. Will the baking soda and vinegar thing help?? Depends on what the problem is! We're waiting on you to tell us more.
 
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Old 11-23-02, 07:37 PM
magister
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Actually, my problem is so complex and has occupied my thinking for a couple of weeks that it'd be difficult to fully explain in a forum; Plus, I'm about ready to capitulate and deal with the resulting mess, one way or the other; But it's the weekend and I live in the middle of the desert, so please consider my question more rhetorical than anything else...

Though, the second post probably answered my original question making any further discussion possibly moot, but here goes...

My little rocket, you put baking soda in one chamber and vinegar in the other, snap it together and when you set it upright, the plastic missle would shoot 15 to 20 feet in the air. I was wondering if that was the same concept that dictated using the mixture in plumbing; Does it propel the clog down the line, or is it corrosive?

I've also seen mention of mixing bleach and hydrogen peroxide; Now, that sounds corrosive; So to add to my original question; Which would be more corrosive to plain, old-fashioned human excrement? Vinegar and Baking Soda? Or, Peroxide and Bleach?

And to the second reply; Would the water have to be boiling? I realize that you'd add water to wash away the mixture and that boiling water can clear some clogs, but would you flush the line with boiling water for any reason other than "melt"?

And once again, I do have a specific problem which I have identified and though it would be difficult and result in a huge mess; I know what would "fix" it and if pushed, I'd be willing to draw the thing out in it's own thread and deal with all of the "why don't ya?"; "Have you tried?"; But since I know what needs to be done, but am still thinking and hoping for a less messy solution; I figured that more people would benefit from my generic, rhetorical question than to a long complex situation that would apply only to my house in my particular location.

So, what is the most corrosive thing a person could pour on poop that wouldn't eat through cast iron or a rubber coupling?
 
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Old 11-23-02, 08:15 PM
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To answer your question.............

Baking soda and vinegar is non corrosive, won't hurt the pipes.

To try a create pressure in the pipes using this solution would probabbly not work.

You would have to be able isolate this one pipe, capping all line, ie........ vents, other drains on the same line, if they exist on the line before the blockage, all caps would need to withstand the pressure the solution would create on the system.

Let say you was able to cap off all lines affected upstream from the blockage, and was able to pour this soultion in the line, you still would have to be faster then the expansion of the solution once poured into the line to get a cap onto the entrance point you poured it into it.

If you was to get this far, and capped so the pressure could expand in the pipe, only thing else that could go wrong would be possible weak point in the line might begin to leak.

Even if this worked for you, it would probably just push on the blocked pipe to the point the pressure could be relieved, this would not push blockage out of line, only disperse what is there in the pipe and not totally out of it.

Most corrosive is a product called Drain Snake, a high acid solution, nasty stuff, would not ever use this in old drain pipes, not to mention hash smelling and will react in contact with hot water, causing a gas the develope and is dangerous to your health.

So can you answer me a question?

What drain line you having a problem with?
 

Last edited by Plumber2000; 11-23-02 at 08:42 PM.
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Old 11-23-02, 10:24 PM
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Enzyme drain cleaners

More and more plumbers are going with enzyme drain cleaners and avoiding harsh chemicals. The enzymes 'digest' eat away at organic material and unclog the drains. If the toilet is clogged, and a plunger, auger, or snake will not resolve the problem, the toilet can be pulled and the obstruction removed from the toilet.

If you have a clogged sewer, then you may have a sluggish toilet. This could be a result of foreign matter in the line such as roots and/or broken line. If you have new construction, there could be a broken line, poor fittings, or poor design. Sometimes the vent gets clogged as well.
 
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Old 11-24-02, 01:16 AM
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And back to my response --

If you are dealing with something like a lavy drain that is slow, then an enzyme cleaner may be a good solution.

If you have 6" of water standing in the bathtub, you need to snake out the main line to cure the problem.

Magister, you say "Actually, my problem is so complex and has occupied my thinking for a couple of weeks that it'd be difficult to fully explain in a forum".

Try us!!
 
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Old 11-24-02, 04:59 AM
magister
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OK Lefty - You and the moderator, both are seeking a challenge; See my new thread and I welcome any suggestions from anyone to what I've been calling my mathmatic equation...

But I warn you, it isn't pretty...

Peace Out;
R
 
 

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