Toilet drain slopes up

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  #1  
Old 12-31-02, 06:41 AM
Dahammer755
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Toilet drain slopes up

I am remodeling a second floor bathroom in a Cape style house. the toilet is about 6 feet from the vertical waste pipe and the pipe that goes from the toilet to this waste pipe or stack (not too sure about the vocabulary here) is sloped UP. This seems to not have created any problems. Never a blockage or leaks or smells. But it is an older fixture that pumps out the water in a flush. The new fixtures are low flow and I don't know if they will do the job. I know the slope should be down in the drain, but there isn't a simple way to do this. If I lift the flange all the way up the elbow will hit the subfloor and I still don't have a slope in the drain. What is the right thing to do? Fix the drain (somehow) or get a pressure assisted low flow fixture. One other thing, the toilet is upstream (ahead of the bath drain) is this ok? Thanks for the help on this.....
 
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Old 12-31-02, 01:29 PM
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Well it violates the first law of plumbing. If it was my house, regardless of how long it has worked, I would fix it. Murphy is always just around the corner from me. The cost of taking up the floor again would negate the cost of replacing the pipe now. If you can go to 3" pipe and get 1/8 pitch per foot, you can get by with that.
 
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Old 12-31-02, 04:43 PM
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I agree, it is the worst kind of mistake to kill the grade particularly on a toilet drain, but how do you know it isn't grading? have you checked it with a level or are you just eyeing it?... That seems like a silly question, but it is very easy for the angle of the line in relation to the nearby joists to fool you into thinking it has backfall... Anyway, if it isn't grading and it is working I would say leave it... the old toilet might have used more water, but it never PUMPED water out... it still depended on gravity to get to the main sewer and frankly a 6' run backfalling a 1/4" per foot will still hold VERY little water and will likely wash out fine...

As to it being downstream of the bath drain, it is code if the venting is done correctly... send along a drawing if you want or a more detailed description of the drainage system if you are worried that it may be a problem... If you are dealing with cast iron, there is like a 99.5% chance that it is right, cause old school plumbers that worked with cast iron were usually true tradesmen and didn't cut corners often... It wasn't like it is now, where any knucklehead with a saw and a can of glue thinks they are a plumber...
 
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Old 12-31-02, 05:52 PM
Dahammer755
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The grade looked liked it was WAY off when I eyeballed it. You are right, there is some sort of "optical illusion" when I saw it running diagonal between two joists. I did put a level on it and it is off quite a bit. The total run is about 6' or so and in order to get it level (nevermind a slope) I have to lift the flange about 3" above the finish floor. I can only lift it like that because the subfloor is rotted out and I removed it. Lifting the flange end that high puts a good portion of the pipe and closet elbow above the subfloor. Also, the tub drain is connected to this horizontal run also, and lifting it that high puts the bath drain pipes above the subfloor. Soooo...it looks like I have two choices. Either I raise the end where the toilet connects or I lower the other end where it goes into vertical stack. The vertical stack is 3" pipe buried in an interior wall. I see no way to lower that without the horizontal run coming through the ceiling underneath which would look really bad (bath is on second floor). The joists are only so deep, which limits the drop and thus the total run length. I'm thinking of grabbing the Sawzall and slashing away everything and try to figure out a way to get this to work (maybe I should figure out a way and THEN grab the Sawzall)...
 
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Old 12-31-02, 06:25 PM
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Well, the ideal fix would be to cut the vertical stack and move the tee down, but if it is that big of a problem, you can just let the thing run uphill slightly... It will work sufficiently... it wont be right but it will work... Moving it up now may mean a lot more work than you bargain for, like moving the tub drain up and such...
 
 

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