copper pipe leak

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  #1  
Old 04-09-03, 12:21 AM
ballen
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copper pipe leak

The copper pipe that connects to the water main has a leak. I have called a couple of plumbers in for estimates and this is not going to be a simple repair. Nor cheap. Seems that the cement flooring needs to be jack hammered so enough good pipe can be exposed for the repair. Seems the builder somehow bent the pipe coming out of the floor, instead of fixing then, they just went with the bend. What I really need is just a quick fix, something that could get me by for a couple of weeks. I know that replacing the pipe is the only real fix, but I need some time to get the money together. The pipe is so close to the floor, wall and another pipe that I can barely fit a coffee cup under it, while it is not pouring out, it does leak a good bit, and does not take long to fill up and over flow during bath time. We do keep the water turned off when not in use. Is there something that I can get that might slow it down? Can you help????
 
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  #2  
Old 04-09-03, 06:04 AM
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WHERE exactly is it leaking?
A connection? The pipe itself? Is the leak above the concrete?
You may be able to repair it without breaking concrete. It depends on where and what is leaking.
Please give us more detail, and we'll try to help you.
Mike
 
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Old 04-09-03, 08:14 PM
ballen
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The pipe is leaking at a connection above the concrete. It is not leaking where the pipe has been bent. The pipe comes out of the cement after about 4 inches is the cutoff valve, immediately after the valve is a elbow going towards the left, the elbow is connected to a short piece of pipe, (which is where the leak is, it seems almost like a pin hole leak, that just sprays out a tiny steady stream) the pipe is maybe 2 inches long, again this is connected to a elbow that goes towards the back, this is connected to another pipe that is maybe 3.5 inches long, this is connected to another elbow going back towards the right. another short piece of pipe which is connected to a tee that connects to the pipe leading into the house.

It seems like it is just one connection on top of another. Does not seem like there is room to make anymore cuts to make another connection above the cutoff valve. The pipe that is bent is what is coming out of the cement, although to me it just seems to lean somewhat to the back.

Today I crawled up under there and checked out really good, I think that maybe the pipe just needs to be cut just below the cutoff valve, and right after the last elbow. Put in new valve and just go with 1 elbow, then another piece of pipe, then another elbow to connect the last piece of pipe that connects to the tee. It would get rid of all of those multiple connections, and put a little more room in between the 3 pipes that are down there. My husband disagrees. But I don't see the problem in doing it, I think that this would be the perfect fix.
 
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Old 04-10-03, 07:38 AM
T
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Is the pipe soldered to the cutoff valve or is it screwed in? If the leak is after the cutoff valve there should be no need to break the concrete.
 
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Old 04-10-03, 07:56 AM
ballen
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The leak is after the cutoff valve, everything is sodered.
 
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Old 04-10-03, 12:03 PM
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There should be no need to replace the cut-off valve.
Just sweat the pipe from the discharge side of it apart and replumb it to your supply line without all of the elbows (use only as many elbows as necessary).
OR, you could just sweat out that little piece of pipe that is leaking and just replace it.
Good luck!
Mike
 
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Old 04-10-03, 12:42 PM
ballen
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Thanks, I think that I will just sweat it out at the cutoff valve and go ahead and get rid of all those elbows, the worst thing that can happen is it not to work. Perfect chance for him to tell me "I told you so." But if it works I have saved some big bucks, which always works.
 
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Old 04-10-03, 01:00 PM
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If this is all exposed, you also can opt to use compression fittings (couplings and elbows) and not have to solder anything back together.
Mike
 
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Old 04-10-03, 02:03 PM
T
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I believe some cutting will still be necessary since the pipes will be full of water. Cut first, then swet off and on.
 
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