moving outside faucet

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Old 04-10-03, 09:29 PM
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Question moving outside faucet

Hi,

I've done some very simple work plumbing, with the guidance of my grandfather. Very novice I guess you can say.
Now, I want to move my outside faucet about 9' around the corner of my house so its not 2" on my front patio deck.
I estimate there will be 3 or 4 twists and turns to change the direction of the pipe and maybe 9' of new pipe. But, its in a wide open crawl space so Iwill have plenty of room for the work.
But, does this all sound too much for a novice?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-10-03, 10:10 PM
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When I first started welding, I was always worried about technical specifications and the perfect gas blend and rod. Then my dad told me that itís not rocket science it just melting two pieces of metal together. I think the same type of advice is good here. The main thing is just to make sure you have the tools and the time to do it. Think about it as ďmoving water from A to BĒ donít get to crazy worrying about it. Any job is easier with the proper tools. Itís hard to do a good job at any thing with improper tools. Look at the project and ask yourself if you can solve the problems you see now in your head or with some guidance. If you can you are most likely ready to do it. But if you donít even know where to start, it would be best left to some one with a little more experience. Either way we will be here for you.
 
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Old 04-11-03, 08:15 PM
Mark B
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Yep, Matt has it right. DIY growth only comes from jumping in and doing it. If you've successfully sweated even one copper joint, then you should be able to focus on that success and go on to the type of project you're describing. Probably your biggest challenge will be drilling through the foundation, if that's how you'll route the pipes.

I did this same project last summer. I found the best way to do it was to measure all of your distances, design the best route, calculate the pipe lengths needed with the least amount of connections, then cut and sweat as many of the pieces together into sub-units, so you only have to sweat a few joints while crawling around the crawl space (that's redundant!) learning how to identify spider species! That way, you can make real good sweat joints in a non-challenging environment (your shop or garage!) and minimize your frustration.

Go for it. Good luck and let us all know how it turned out.

Mark
 
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Old 04-11-03, 08:20 PM
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Thanks for the encouragement guys!

I feel like I have pretty good idea of what needs to be done.
Thankfully, the new location is just above the foundation so I will be just drilling through the siding instead of cement foundation.

Shawn
 
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Old 04-11-03, 08:34 PM
Mark B
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Excellent! Take some time to practice on some 1/2 inch copper pipe and then commit yourself to it. I actually practiced sweating joints by making an outdoor self-watering trellis for some climbing roses, just to assure myself that I knew how to do it! Not one leaking joint! Then, into the crawlspace! Good luck, Shawn.

Mark
 
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Old 04-11-03, 09:38 PM
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Speaking of leaking joints. I poked my head into the crawl space to review the situation and I noticed one of the joints that I will be replacing is leaking slightly. Just a little more motivation!

Better watch it Mark. Littleton isn't that far from Longmont in case I have a emergency!


Thanks again
 
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Old 04-12-03, 08:51 PM
poleaxed
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After cutting your old spigot off condsidre using a compression shut-off first to isolate your water.Then after the shut-off all the joints you solder will be water free.And dont forget to be patient.
 
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Old 04-18-03, 03:33 PM
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Ok, here is the first question. The current spigot is threaded at the end where it meets the water pipe from the house. It appears to me that the 1/2" copper pipe must have fit into the pipe of the spigot and it was sweat on from there.

I see at the home center I can get a joint in which has threads that fit the spigot on the one side and is straight on the other side for the copper pipe.

Should I :
A: Try to sweat the pipe to the spigot like it currently is?
B: Or just wrap the spigot threads with tephlon tape and thread it into a threaded joint?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-18-03, 06:45 PM
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A well soldered joint will not leak, a mechanical joint is more prone to leak... It could be argued that the mechanical (threaded) joint is easier if you ever need to put in a new faucet, but I think once you learn to solder a couple joints you will find that it is equally easy... I personally ALWAYS solder the sill cocks (spigots) on.... The one you see on your house is probably designed to be done either way which is why you see the threads, but the plumber decided to solder it... Many frost free and regular sill cocks will be designed to be done either way...
 
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Old 04-28-03, 10:33 AM
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Thanks for all the info guys. I completed the project a week ago last Saturday. I just went back down into the crawlspace over this past weekend to recheck the pipes and everything is nice and dry! And my new faucet works great! I had a few problems not letting the pipe heat up enough before adding my solder. But, I fixed that and everything went rather smooth!
 
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