Installing sewage ejector pump in basement

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Old 05-06-03, 10:28 AM
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Installing sewage ejector pump in basement

Does anyone have experience in installing a sewage ejector pump in basement that involves breaking concrete floor for the pump pit an running drain lines for fixtures under the floor?
 
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Old 05-06-03, 05:02 PM
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I would think several of us have experience with sewage ejectors... What's the question?
 
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Old 05-06-03, 08:23 PM
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I originally planned to leave this part of building a basement bathroom to a plumber. however, after talking to a half a dozen plumbers I realized they want too much money for this that is beyond my budget. So I will have to do this myself. I made research on the web about sewage ejector pumps and installation process so I have some idea about that. However, I feel I still need some good advise and guide from the person who actually did what I am going to do.
First question, what model to choose. I seem to be choosing Zoeller sewage ejector, but I am unsure which model to choose. I called the company and talked to a pro there. I want to buy the whole package not just a pump but pit, check valve, etc.
Second, I am unsure what demolition hummer to rent for the job. I cam to tools rental department and talked briefly with a guy there explaining that I need to break concrete about 35" deep. He said that no electrical hummer can do this job and advised me to rent the only gas powered hummer that they have. I never used demolition hummer and I am afraid that too powerful hummer will create too much vibration that could affect the house structure and for instance break pipe joints. I am also not sure how much concrete floor to break. I thought that I need to break a hole for the pump pit and then narrow grooves alongside under floor drain pipes. However, one plumber when asked who he would do this said they will break one large hole under entire bathroom area. I am afraid to break so much foundation floor.
I am also unsure how to fix the pit firmly before pouring fresh concrete. Also should I put gravel or stones and then pour concrete and just pour concrete? Can I use the pieces of old concrete that I broke?

I would be very thankful to someone who can in addition to answer aforementioned questions would provide me a detailed step-by-step guide for the process and specify those issues I should put my special attention to.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 07:34 AM
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I've never seen any residential concrete jobs being 35" thick. Those are in the sky-scrapers teritory. Your basement floor is generally around 4" thick, and any decent hammer will break that easily. Most basement walls I've seen are less then 16" thick, and in new constructions they are usually 8".
 
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Old 05-07-03, 10:00 AM
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I didn't know that. However, the pit is 35" deep. does it mean I have to dig soil underneath the concrete floor? If so can the water from the soil start to sip inside the basement through the hole I am going to make for the pit? Should the pit be sealed to prevent this? I currently have sump pump installed in my basement. The pit for the sump pump is about 10' from the place where the ejector pump pit will be. The sump pump pit is always dry.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 11:56 AM
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why dont you get the self-contained unit that sits on top of your basement floor and stop going overboard.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 12:03 PM
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I don't understand what you mean by "sits on top of your basement floor"? I need to put the sewage pump pit under the floor so that the basement bathroom fuxtures (toilet, lavatory and shower) will drain to the pit.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 12:12 PM
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If you have no underground piping for the basement bathroom in place (the toilet and shower will definetely need to be drained bellow floor level), then you need to break a lot more concrete then just for the ejector pit. You normally have about 4" of concrete to break, then all you have is some sand and dirt to go through.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 12:24 PM
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I do not have anything yet. I understand that I have to break concrete floor to install the pit and run all drain lines to fixtures. I would really like to hear from someone who already did this.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 01:16 PM
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I've broken up a concrete basement floor to install a sink and shower, but I had a sewer line under the concrete, so I didn't need the ejector pit. But the process is the same.

Determine the location of your fixtures. Determine how the plumbing will need to run under the floor. Draw it out on the floor with a marker. I used a big Bosch hammer drill to get through the concrete, which was about 4 inches. I started by drilled holes 2 inches deep every 2 or 3 inches along each side of the trench I was making. Then, I switched from the drill to a jack-hammer type attachment, and broke up the concrete into section I could remove.

Have you spoken with the town inspector? They might be able to help you with your project. You ARE getting a permit for this, aren't you?

Also check out www.saniflo.com for a version that does not require excavation.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 01:31 PM
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Thank you for your info. I will certainly be applying for a permit before doing anything. Our township requires drawing of all plumbing lines and fixtures and detailed written description of the project to be done to get the permit. I never applied for plumbing permit before. I also realize so although a plumbing inspector may but is not required to teach me how to do this or that part of the project. So I am trying to collect as much information as possible from the people who already did what I am going to do.

How wider did you make the trench relative to the pipe size that installed in the trench? After connecting the drain pipes did you pour concrete to the trenches you made? did you use gravel or stones or pieces of old concrete debris you drilled out for trenches?
 
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Old 05-07-03, 01:55 PM
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The trench was about 4 times the diamer of the pipe, and larger in the area where it all connected to the existing cast iron drain line.

I removed all chunks of concrete larger than abou 1/2 inch. For backfill, I used the sand I had excavated (my subsoils were all sand), but ended up with more than I needed, and had to carry it out of the basement along with all the broken concrete. I backfilled the sand to the bottom of the old slab, and made sure to settle the backfill material very well. I used water to help pack the bedding material and backfill material down. I poured concrete over the trenches the same thickness as the existing floor.
 
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