Boosting hose output

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-07-03, 10:33 AM
dsiegris
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Unhappy Boosting hose output

I recently tried to hook up three hoses end to end to water my back yard. The sprinkler was only able to spray about 2-3 feet in the air. Is this due to the three hoses? When I had a single hose the the pressure seemed OK. What can I do to get the pressure back there? I have taken over a yard from previous owners that must have like moles and grubs. The yard is a disgrace.
Hoping for some plumbing insight,
Dan
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-07-03, 10:50 AM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,952
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool

Yes, you can loose water pressure over distance and elevation.
Are you on a well or public water?
Mike
 
  #3  
Old 05-07-03, 01:23 PM
dsiegris
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Low hose pressure

I am on a city sewer and water line. My house is 60 years old, but the cold water has few repairs in it. The hot is a completely different situation. Don't get me going on that. The plumbing is the original steel pipes. The water co. was out last week for an unrelated problem, and told me that the cold looked original.

Let me know if you need other information.
Dan
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-03, 01:51 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,952
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool

If you have 60-year-old galvanized pipes, your water pressure is going to be restricted and will continue to deteriorate.
Galvanized is notorious for scaling up inside until it eventually plugs up completely.
Unfortunately, it sounds like you're about due for a re-plumbing project. The normal "useful life" of galvanized is about 40 years, but as you can see, it can last much longer, but only so long.
If you DIY, start nearest your fixtures where the galvanized tends to plug up first, and work your way back out to the meter.
Check with your Building Inspection Department for local plumbing code, permit and inspection requirements, which can vary from place to place.
You have a number of piping options when replumbing. Some are easier and less expensive than others, such as CPVC plastic.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
  #5  
Old 05-07-03, 07:13 PM
dsiegris
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question cpvc

I have been stocking up to rerun all of the hot water pipes in my house. I currently have all the CPVC and a cutter to do that. I have most of the fittings, just waiting for a good day to go through and redo them. The entire house is currently run with 1/2-inch. I am planning to redo all with 3/4-inch. Will this boost my output, too? How long can I expect CPVC to last without problems?

Comparison (for learning sake) question: If I have normal pressure with 1/2-inch pipe, and I swap it out for 3/4-inch pipe. How noticable will the pressure difference be?

Thanks, Dan
 
  #6  
Old 05-07-03, 07:36 PM
Ragnar's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 1,349
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you want to do the job right, run 1/2" to each fixture... Just don't feed more than one fixutre with 1/2"... In general, just run 3/4" where there was originally 3/4" and 1/2" where there was originally 1/2"... You also are not lacking in PRESSURE, you are lacking in volume, but the reason you are lacking volume is not because you have 1/2" pipes.... It is because your 1/2" piping has corroded nearly shut and you are getting about 1/4" worth of water to each fixture... Also, if you are a big yard guy, when you rerun the main cold line that feeds the front outside faucet, hook the faucet up on the "streetside" of the pressure reducing valve, so that it will be full city pressure... Then you will get a ton of volume and pressure and can run 500' of hose with a sprinkler if you want...
 
  #7  
Old 05-07-03, 08:04 PM
dsiegris
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question "street-side"

I have about 1' of pipe coming out of the ground before it gets to my meter. Are you talking about placing the hose outlets before the meter, or after them, but before anything else? If it's before, I'd definitely need to have the water shut off at the street. But, that'd mean I'd be using free water. Not seeming legal. Is my later interptretation correct? After the meter, but before everything?

I am reletively new to this plumbing thing. I will not be tackling this solely on my own though, so don't worry too much.
 
  #8  
Old 05-07-03, 08:07 PM
dsiegris
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Smile oops!

I see it now... On the street side of the pressure reducing valve, not of the meter. However, on the street side of the meter sounds more economical (until I got caught).
 
  #9  
Old 05-08-03, 03:26 AM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,952
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool

Here is an article on converting to CPVC pipe from Reader's Digest "The Family Handyman" magazine that might help you:
http://www.familyhandyman.com/200007/cpvc/main.html
Good Luck!
Mike
 
  #10  
Old 05-08-03, 12:44 PM
Ragnar's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 1,349
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
YO D... while the city side of the meter would certainly be economical... LOL... you definitely don't want to do that... Yes, I mean just inside your house in the crawlspace or the basement or whatever, in this order... Tee for your front faucet, then the main shutoff for the house, and THEN the pressure reducing valve... Now what you have is a valve on the street side of your main shutoff and prv... Now if you ever have need of shutting down the water to the whole house, you still have water for construction or cleaning or whatever... AND it is full pressure so that you can use it for irrigation and washing vehicles, gutters, siding, etc... That is the way it would be on a new home if done correctly... The other faucets around the house can be on the low pressure (house-side) of the prv....
 
  #11  
Old 05-31-03, 09:06 PM
dsiegris
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
What I got...

This is the same as a posting I had for a seperate question. Answer is 100% the same....

http://images.snapfish.com/3377672323232%7Ffp8%3Enu%3D3238%3E29%3A%3E794%3Ewsnrcg%3D3232493754999nu0mrj

See if the above link (when cut and pasted into web browser) will allow you to view my "situation."

I have a small amount of pipe coming out of the ground. It makes a sharp 90-degree turn into another immediate 90-degree turn. From this turn it does a loop (yes, a loop) into the meter. I am assuming that the meter holds the key to the depletion of my water pressure. From the meter it makes the return trip of the "loop" (you gotta see this thing) back to the house shut-off and then a sharp 90-degree towards then up the wall. There is no place for me to insert fittings or anything of the like.
D
 
  #12  
Old 05-31-03, 09:24 PM
Plumber2000's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 5,841
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Elarged Image.

 
  #13  
Old 05-31-03, 10:11 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,136
Received 37 Votes on 35 Posts
Another option:

Dan:

Upgrading the plumbing in your house will get you more pressure at the hose connection but you will still have high pressure drop at your sprinkler because of the long hose length.
If you are using three lengths of 1/2" hose, three lengths of 3/4" will give you about the same pressure drop as one length of 1/2".
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: