Gas pipe for barbeque grill

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-19-03, 12:02 PM
kk007
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Gas pipe for barbeque grill

Since this is a question about gas pipe, I guess I will get many discourgaing advice, but here it is anyway.

I am going to convert my barbeque grill to natural gas from propane. What should be the pipe size? I think 1/2" would be sufficient but I just want to make sure.

If I measre exactly 64" from "turn to turn"(on paper), given the width of 2 elbows, what shoul be the pipe length, e.g., 62", 63"? Also, How much should I subtart from a straight line If I were to install a union (assuming 1/2" pipe)? I want to cut the pipe just the right length. Thanks for your help.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-19-03, 04:04 PM
notuboo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Kansas City MO
Posts: 1,780
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What size do you think the orfices on the burner should be?
 
  #3  
Old 05-19-03, 05:01 PM
Ragnar's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 1,349
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I will leave the conversion on the grill itself to you as I don't have sufficient knowledge to advise you on exactly how to change it over... You DO need to have proper orifice sizes on the grill and cannot just change the gas feed to it, so research it well before you start... It can be a very dangerous project... As for the gas line, yes 1/2" is sufficient, even overkill, but you will convert to something flexible near the grill anyway, and that should be equivalent to 3/8" o.d. copper atleast... As for the 64" run, it is impossible to give an exact measurement as no two elbows thread exactly the same... A good guess would be to allow about 1" for each elbow, but if you put a union in, the better thing to do is to buy the union, a 60" piece of 1/2" which will be standard Home Depot stuff, and then buy a few nipples starting at 1" and going up to about 3" in .5" increments, all of which can be bought off the shelf without having to cut anything... That way, if the plan changes at all when you get home, you should have what you need...
 
  #4  
Old 05-20-03, 05:59 AM
kk007
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you for the help. Yes, I am aware that the natural gas requires a larger orfice. I was going to drill the existing one but decided to buy it from the manufacturer (Weber). It cost me about $100 including a 12' hose and coupling, etc. A good price, I thought.
Are Home Depot pipes good enough? Or should I get them from Plumbing supply stores.
I know I have to use galvanized pipe for outdoor, which will run aobut 10'. I think I can get a 10' pipe from stores but am thinking about using a union for ease of use. Is this a good idea? Thanks for your help.
 
  #5  
Old 05-20-03, 04:34 PM
notuboo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Kansas City MO
Posts: 1,780
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Any thoughts on valving this project?

I do not like to give out D-I-Y info on gas work, but when I see good intentioned answers not quite complete, I see future problems.

Home Depot pipe is fine... You can even have it cut and threaded to the proper length you need.

Unions are a great idea... There may even be a code or 2 that covers it.
 
  #6  
Old 05-21-03, 08:25 AM
kk007
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Dear "Notuboo,"

What did you mean by "valving?" I am plannig to install a valve inside the house and another before the grill. Is that what you mean?
 
  #7  
Old 05-21-03, 05:05 PM
notuboo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Kansas City MO
Posts: 1,780
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Exactly...

Good luck with your project...
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: