soldering an elbow

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Old 05-23-03, 01:15 PM
yesboss
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Question soldering an elbow

I am trying to solder an elbow of 1/2" copper, to join 2 other pieces of copper tubing. When I apply the heat from the torch should I try to fit both tubes at once into the elbow? Or is there a trick to it? Also, when applying flux, do I wait for the flux to melt and dry before I solder? I am attempting to complete a washer
move, that is all copper tubing. I have no choice but to do it myself.

Any light shed would be appreciated

The Rookie Solderer
 
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Old 05-23-03, 01:25 PM
harryhomeowner
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If you have 3 pipes to go together use a T- fitting, then paint the insides ofh te female fitings, and hte utside of the male fittings (the tubes) with flux. Test fit them. When all is in order, apply heat and sweat them joints

From a just beyond novice.
 
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Old 05-23-03, 01:35 PM
yesboss
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Question soldering

Originally posted by harryhomeowner
If you have 3 pipes to go together use a T- fitting, then paint the insides ofh te female fitings, and hte utside of the male fittings (the tubes) with flux. Test fit them. When all is in order, apply heat and sweat them joints

From a just beyond novice.
Harry, this is just an elbowjoint. When I apply the heat do I need to fit both tubes at once? The reason I ask is because I soldered the elbow on one piece of tube. The when I went to join the other one, it melted the first joint and everything fell apart. Did I use too much heat? Ruin the vaccuum?
 
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Old 05-23-03, 01:36 PM
harryhomeowner
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Just put it all together, then solder.

Some tips I have learned.

-Make sure there is no water in the pipes, or at least no water within a few inches of what you're working on.

-Hold the heat on the female part, not the male. The outside should expand (from the heat) so there is room for hte solder to get sucked into.

-Hold the solder onto the opposite side you have the heat, don't melt it with the fame, the pipe should be hot enough to melt it.

-Once it starts to melt take hte flame away, and make sure the solder went around hte whole joint, then put a wet rag on it to cool it.

Hope this helps, and if anyone sees any erors, please feel free to post corrections; I've just learned myself!
 
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Old 05-23-03, 01:40 PM
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Yep, clean both fittings and pipe your working with, apply flux to both the fittings and the pipe, assembly the pipes, apply the heat, with solder in one hand and tourch in the other, heat up the fitting, so often touch the solder to the edge of the fittins, you will see the solder flow when it gets hot enough, after it flows all the way around the joint, remove heat and let cool.
 
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Old 05-23-03, 08:42 PM
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And never try to make up one side of a joint... there is no case where that is ever necessary... You will only cause the other side to come loose or leak when you heat the second side as you found out...
 
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