polyphosphate water treatment system

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-01-03, 12:04 PM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
polyphosphate water treatment system

I've got what seems to be pretty high iron content in my well water. Electric Co-op sells a polyphosphate system (Scaltrol) that supposedly binds up the iron so it doesn't precipitate (like on the toilet bowl). Also supposed to take away the metallic taste.

Any one used this type of system? Experiences good and bad would be appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-02-03, 09:29 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: PA
Posts: 117
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I work for a municipal water system and we use this sort of chemical treatment to sequester the iron and keep it in solution rather than let it precipitate out in our distribution system or in people's home plumbing.

This works well, although I prefer to use a mechanical means where possible because I don't feel that adding chemicals is the way to fix everything, especially where people have to ingest them.

I would try a simple inline filter first, or maybe even two of them in series to see if that will help. The chemical additive may be difficult to get right and when the treated water gets into your hot water heater, it's chemistry changes anyway. It's hard enough to treat water that's all the same temperature, but trying to use a single system to treat water of two extremely different temperatures can be a real [email protected](( buster.

Besides, you should ALWAYS try the cheapest solution first.
 
  #3  
Old 07-02-03, 10:17 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for your response.

My concerns exactly. Stains in the sink and shower stall would probably not be helped with this polyphosphate system, because of the hot water changing the chemistry. And I don't feel good either about ingesting a chemical.

Wonder why so many electric co-ops offer this?

Any suggestions as to sources of in-line filters for iron?
 
  #4  
Old 07-02-03, 11:16 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: PA
Posts: 117
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My parents have a lot of iron in their water and they just use a typical in line particulate filter. You can get these at any plumbing supply place or box store like home depot. I believe that there are different pore sizes, to trap different sized particles. The only thing that I would watch out for is getting too small a pore size cause it could cause a significant loss of pressure. Each manufacturer should have data about how much pressure loss can be expected through their filter assembly.

If you do go with this treatment, you will probably have to change the filters fairly often.

Before you put the system in place it may help to shock the well and your plumbing really good with chlorine. You can get HTH at a pool store and put in a few scoops.... go inside and run a faucet for a while, and if you begin to smell chlorine, then you added enough.

Run each faucet in the house until you get the chlorine smell (to pull the chlorinated water through each branch of the plumbing system) and then let that chlorinated water sit in the pipes overnight. In the morning, open up your faucets and let em rip to flush all of that out of your system. Hopefully this will purge any iron built up inside your pipes. It will take a while for the chlorine smell to go away, - just be prepared. If you have a septic system, you'll want to toss in some septic helper packets when you're done with this just to be sure that the super chlorinated water didn't kill all your bugs.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: