Calcified connection

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Old 07-04-03, 10:43 AM
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Calcified connection

I'd like to change the hot water hose running from my washing machine to the valve. The problem is where the hose connects to the valve it is "welded" together by years of built up mineral deposits (greenish white stuff - ?lime/calcium deposits). I'm unable to loosen the connection & I don't want to over force it for fear of breaking the pipe. I tried to loosen the ?angle vavle where it connects to the pipe coming in figuring I could just replace it as well since its pretty well covered with deposits but it won't budge even with a pipe wrench & again I don't want to overdo it for fear of cracking the pipe. In these cases what is normally done to replace these areas? Is it necessary to actually cut the piping or is there someway of loosening/ removing the deposits so one can unscrew the connections? Where the hose is connected to the angle valve is rusted as well & sooner or later if left alone I imagine will cause a real problem. Thanks for any advice.
 
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Old 07-04-03, 11:00 AM
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Cool

First, turn off the hot water by closing the cold water supply valve to the water heater (cuts off hot water only), in case something breaks.
Soak down the corroded valve and hose connection with a solvent such as WD-40.
Use a backup pipe wrench to hold the valve so that you don't twist the pipe, and use channel-lock pliers on the hot water hose connection to unscrew it.
If you need to replace the valve, check to see if it is screwed onto the pipe or soldered on, if copper.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 07-04-03, 11:50 AM
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Thanks for the reply. Just a point - I dealing with a washing machine not a hot water heater - For the most part I can't imagine it makes a major difference relative to what I'm asking. Also shutting the hot water supply is easy enough because further upstream there is a shutoff vavle which feeds the hot water line going to the washing machine.

Does vinegar have any use in these cases? I've seen it mentioned elsewhere to help dissolve mineral deposits. Would using vinegar on the hose connections and valve have any adverse affects? or would it just not help?

Thanks again
 
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Old 07-04-03, 12:51 PM
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Cool

Believe it or not, as senile as I am, I understood that you're working on a washing machine hot water hose connection.
The reference to the water heater was just "how to turn off the hot water only" which is what you said that you're working on at the washing machine.
If you have another cut-off valve to the washing machine hot water line, use that one. Most folks don't, and I can't see everything too well from here. LOL
The point simply was to turn off the water to prevent geysers when working on corroded connections that may crumble or break, however you want to do it.
Vinegar will work on calcium deposits, but it may take overnight or longer to dissolve them, and it really needs to be soaking in a vinegar-filled container to work best.
WD-40 works faster, but you can do whatever you want to help dissolve the corrosion before unscrewing the hose connection.
I only give free advice on how I'd do it. Been there, done that.
Your job. Your call.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 07-04-03, 01:11 PM
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Thanks again

I'll let you know how it turns out
 
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Old 07-08-03, 09:19 AM
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I tried your suggestion. No luck. The hose connection won't budge. I'm afraid if I force it any harder I'll just end up cracking the pipes. Any other suggestions?
 
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Old 07-08-03, 09:40 AM
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Here are some pictures of the connection I'm talking about. Don't knowif this forum will let me send them but here goes anyway.

What kind of pipe connection are these (If you don't get the pictures) what I'm talking about is the valve looks like it connects to a end cap thing. Looks as if it has a hat on with a screw through it into the feeding pipe?
 
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