Help Me Remove This Faucet!

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  #1  
Old 07-21-03, 07:32 AM
merrygrace55
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Angry Help Me Remove This Faucet!

http://ca.f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/bc/....src=ph&.view=


I've tried, and I've tried, but I just can't do it...Is it welded on or something?

Thanks in advance...

Mary
 
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Old 07-21-03, 07:53 AM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
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Cool

It shouldn't be, best that I can tell from the photos.
The faucet should unscrew counter-clockwise from the soldered female threaded fitting on the end of the copper line.
Hold a back-up wrench on that female fitting, and use channel-lock pliers or a pipe wrench for leverage and shower down on it to the left as you face the fitting.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 07-21-03, 10:28 AM
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To take this faucet off, you should turn off the water and then use tubing cutters to cut the two pieces of copper that connect it... Then with them cut, you should be able to unscrew them from underneath... With the two pieces of copper unscrewed, you can then take off the nuts that secure the faucet to the sink... One of them in the picture is already loosened all the way down to the copper but until the copper is taken off, the nut won't come off... With both nuts off, the faucet will come out...
 
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Old 07-21-03, 12:57 PM
merrygrace55
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Thanks for the responses, gentleman....


My question is in particular for Ragnar...Given that you suggest that I use a tube cutter, does that mean I have to use a blow-torch to put it back on? I'm just a little worried about that, given that I have no experience with such devices...

I was just hoping to unscrew the old one, and put the new one on without any significant hassle...If I DO have to torch this baby, would you suggest that I buy the flexible hoses and replace the shutoff valves as well at this point?

Sorry for the followup, I won't bother you all again!

Mary
 
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Old 07-21-03, 05:59 PM
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Cool

You won't have to solder anything.
Just use a compression fitting type shut-off valve.
Replacing the flex supply lines also is a good idea. The built-in rubber seals of the old ones are probably no good for new fittings by now.
(Don't worry about "bothering" us. This is what we do for fun.)
Good Luck!
 
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Old 07-21-03, 06:07 PM
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I may have looked at those pictures incorrectly but it looked like you didn't have ANY supplies.. It looked to be hard piped in with 1/2" copper... So what I was suggesting was to cut the copper (you don't have a choice on that), and after you reinstall the new faucet, you just put on some compression stops about 12" or so below the bottom of the faucet, and then retie it up with flex supplies...

You won't need a torch at all...
 
  #7  
Old 07-24-03, 06:09 PM
merrygrace55
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Thank you for your help...

I have just purchased the supplies tonight, and, hopefully tomorrow, everything will be fine...It's odd in that now, after buying the compression fittings, i have doubts, since I have read on the internet that they are not as reliable as the old fashioned 'sweated' fittings via blowtorch. But, i'm sure that the experts on this board (not to mention the big box DIY store) have steered me in the right direction...

Thanks again,


Mary in Toronto
 
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Old 07-24-03, 07:44 PM
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Compression joints will last 50+ years if done right... Don't worry... Compression joints are code, and also are used about 90 percent of the time on copper pipes under fixtures... They are completely correct to use....
 
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