where to drain the sump pump to?

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Old 12-23-03, 09:33 AM
AdrianM
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where to drain the sump pump to?

I'm having a new house built in VA and I noticed that, on similar houses by the same builder, the sump pumps to a pipe which dumps the water on to the driveways. I don't want that to happen so I'm looking for different ways of doing it.
Any suggestions?
 
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Old 12-23-03, 10:33 AM
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A. If there is a storm drain system, you can have it plumbed directly to it (or to a sewer system or septic system, if permissible), or
B. Through the curb to the gutter if on a paved street, or
C. To a roadside drainage ditch, or
D. Into an underground "dry well", which is just a covered pit filled with gravel, old bricks, etc. large enough to handle the volume.
There are a number of alternatives other than surface drainage, especially onto your driveway.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 12-23-03, 11:03 AM
AdrianM
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thanks for the reply. a couple of notes/questions:
we have no piped storm drainage. if I pipe to the street curb and gutter then, as I have a level lot, won't the pipe be very near to the surface if it drians to the curb? as a rough guess I'd say the pipe would be no more than 6" below the ground as it exits at the curb. won't that be subject to freezing as the slope wouldn't be steep.
what about just draining to a splash block at the front of the house into a landscaped area with bushes, mulch, etc? This option would cetainly be cheaper as it entails no real change to the contract.
on another note: right now our contract calls for the tie into the existing San Sewer line on our lot: would it be advantageous to replace the the line all the way to the street tie in? and if so how much in $$ should I consider for that work, against the possible drawback of not replacing it? eg. if the builder says it's a $5K add now, then how much would it cost later if I had to go back and do it down the line. I figure the extension to the street would be approx 20 lnft in a mostly grassy area, except at the sidewalk.
 
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Old 12-23-03, 11:22 AM
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Draining the sump onto a splashblock to the landscaped surface would be the least expensive way to do it, as an alternative to your driveway.
even though the sump discharge is by pump, you still should have 1/4" per linear foot of slope for the drain line, so the lawn is the way to go I would think, without being able to see it.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 12-23-03, 08:09 PM
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I don't think it would be permissible to discharge the pump into the septic or sewer system. That's strictly prohibitted under the UPC. The street gutter is fine, but you MIGHT have to do it as an encroachment, depending on what your local jurisdiction requires. And that has been known to get a bit pricey. Around here, the City is pretty proud of there gutters -- it would cost me about $2K to drain a sump pump through one, plus whatever it cost to get the drain line run to that last foot before the gutter!!
 
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Old 12-23-03, 08:37 PM
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I would go with discharging the water into the landscaping as long as the grade is pitched away from the house. Make absolutely certain that the water doesn't lay against the foundation.

You'll also have to screen the end of the discharge line to keep the critters out.
 
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Old 12-24-03, 05:39 AM
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I stand kerreckted!
I see what I recommended done around here, but then again this aint CA, Toto. lol
 
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Old 12-24-03, 06:42 AM
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Oldguy-
What you recommended is commonly seen in CA. We really aren't THAT weird. (lol)

One of my gutter downspouts kicks onto the drive, but Adrian didn't want that.

In San Jose, CA, storm drains and sewers are separate systems and they are never tied together. Property drainage (not sewers) is sometimes run under the sidewalk and through the face of curb so water can flow down the curb to the nearest catch basin. Since the sidewalks and curbs are in the public right of way, this requires an encroachment permit from the applicable permitting jurisdiction - usually the city. Few people want to go through the cost and aggravation.
 
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Old 12-24-03, 10:41 AM
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Sump Line

Adrian, you can take it from someone who knows about underground sump lines. Don't do it if you can live with any other way. I have to deal with an underground line at Grandma's house that plugs up every two years with red algae at precisely 4AM in the morning, and I get the call from the alarm company, when the sump monitor sends them the signal that the basement is about to flood. I have to hook up a separate plastic line at that point and run the water outside anyway. If there was a way to run an outdoor line that didnt make the condo look like a lake freight vessel pumping its bilge (I have serious water running into this sump. They didnt call this area the Great Black Swamp for no reason!) I would have a line into the landscaping in a minute. I could at least check the line occasionally to make sure it was clear, without the roto rooter bill of $80 plus. By the way, I didnt tell you that I have to wake up her neighbors in the condo next to them, or their sump will overflow too, and I have to get to the line from THEIR crawl space. This line has a 150 foot foot run.
Im in the middle of doing some preventive over there right now, so I am venting.

Happy Holidays!
 
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Old 12-29-03, 05:52 AM
AdrianM
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thanks for the replies all. it looks like the landscaping is the way to go, both for cost and ease of checking the line later. I don't want to deal with the county at this late stage, they'll be doing plumbing rough-in next week, or so I'm told
The slab plumbing is already set in stone - well, concrete anyway.
 
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