Tap water odor

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Old 06-24-04, 05:43 PM
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Tap water odor

A while back I had a plumber replace a cold water supply line (CPVC). Shortly thereafter we noticed a bad taste to the water out of the faucet. I has been this way for a month or so with no improvement during this time. We thought it was a result of some pcv dope that was used to connect the pipe. We are on city water.

Any ideas on a cause and fix? Thanks.
 
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Old 06-26-04, 02:35 PM
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Nope, it is the piping. I cannot advise you what to do with this situation because I avoid using plastic piping for water lines like the plague.



Here is an excerpt from a very informational link, I will post a segment of what pertains to your situation.


Considerations of CPVC pipe include:

Generally limited to 1/2" to 2" Copper Pipe Size
Some complaints of "plastic taste" in water
 
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Old 06-28-04, 06:20 AM
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DB, just as I thought. Sounds like something that won't go away until it is replaced. We have had PCV for years and this is the first time we ever noticed a persistant aftertaste to the water.

As I remember, the plumbers let the glue set for only about 30 minutes, tops. This could be the cause in this particular case.

Anyway, thanks for the response and link, as it served to confirmed my fears.
 
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Old 06-29-04, 09:43 PM
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I use both PVC and CPVC and have installed it in a few thousand homes to install water treament equipment over the last 16 years. So far no complaints such as yours. In most installs I wait maybe 10-20 minutes before turning the water on; I'm working on a maximum of 65# of pressure due to private well water systems.

But then I don't slather on the 'glue' like I've seen some (plumbers) do.... And I wouldn't believe all I read in that builders sponsored web site; especially about bacteria in plastic plumbing. I think they like copper too much to be objective.

Gary
Quality Water Associates
 
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Old 06-29-04, 10:46 PM
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Post Take heed in Manufacturer's Recommendations, Not personal experiences

As always, constructive criticism is welcome for plumbers and those who are unlicensed in the profession of installing potable water systems without proper licensing in the state they reside in. One can learn above and beyond the reasons of licensing, not dispute the reasons why they don't have to. Homeowners are given full right and responsibility to do with thier plumbing as need be, such as use thier own personal choice of materials, products, plumbing fixtures. The state department of Buildings, Housing, and Construction do have a say-so in the operation of unlicensed individuals installing plumbing systems in homes for profit. These are State-wide statutes that can and will be enforced for those who practice without such requirements. States vary in the enforcement of this legality.


One can only formulate an opinion without such credentials.


I do recall and can provide factual data straight from the makers of plastic piping, the manufacturers of solvent weld cleaner and glue makers that recommend on the label, " Wait 2 hours before applying pressure to newly solvent weld joints."


Now, it doesn't decipher air or water, I assume air would be the latter, but better for the solvent weld joint. Water can slowly disentegrate a solvent weld joint if applied too soon, leading to taste and odor issues, and the capability of connections failing over a shortened period of time.


The link I posted above is accurate and is based off of factual knowledge and reported case histories of both the use of copper and cpvc piping. Numerous search engines results of keywords relating to CPVC and its downfalls can be found with similar results. The opposition of copper is usually short-handed with escalations of pinhole stories that never grow past the 3% of reported cases across the United States.


The link also states, " 10 minutes before subjecting pipe to air pressure testing, 24 hour usual cure time before water testing." < Majority of piping issues related to that statement is the #1 reason why there is so many problems with improper workmanship issue. Not the product most times, just the installer.


"It worked for me" instruction does not always dictate proper installation, but personal opinion. Following the manufacturer's requirements and recommendations will allow for the proper application of materials to be joined and provide normal expectancy of such workmanship.


If you follow "worked for me" application on workmanship that defies proper installation, you have only yourself to blame for product failure/shortened material functionality.




Plastic piping comes with a slew of problems associated with the products that have had short life spans which resulted in major class action Lawsuits that not only affect property values, but property damage and structure damage to millions of homes.


Blue Max piping and PB piping were two of the biggest reported plastic pipe failures in recorded history in the plumbing industry.


Two piping systems that were "The best thing since canned ham", and as we all know, the ham spoiled long before it's expiration date.


By no means am I a Plastic Pipe Expert, but I have superior knowledge as a service plumber of now 17 years of how often plastic piping of many sizes and situations are crippled by thier limitations and thier vulnerabilities to temperature variances, UV rays, Chemicals, (chemical taste left in piping) and piping becoming brittle over the life of plastic.



I strongly disagree with the practices of installing any solvent weld joint in potable water piping with a 20 minute cure time and subjecting the solvent weld joint to pressure of 65 pounds, higher or lower, for the mere fact that the product specs state otherwise to make proper adhesion.


I can see why the link above states clearly the reasons for workmanship error on the use of this product.


Thermal Expansion, Malfunctioning Pressure Reducing Valve, Malfunctioning water heater, or water hammer caused by fast-closing solenoid valves commonly found on washing machines, dishwashers, and humidifiers on furnaces that cause a sharp spike in water pressure, if only for a half a second that can rupture water line connections that were not properly made.

If ever in doubt with any advice given, you can go directly to ASTM specifications of such material and get full disclosure of the product requirements for correct installation. Thier rules have the final say.




Just goes to show that plumbers are guilty of improper workmanship, as you are experiencing first hand. And there are those that practice the profession without the proper knowledge that can and will affect the industry and general public alike with only partial knowledge in regards to plumbing and all the parameters that all closely associate with each other in an aging plumbing system.


Follow-up with your results of the repair; hopefully the installer of your piping will cease the habit of rushing water lines.
 

Last edited by DUNBAR PLUMBER; 06-29-04 at 11:00 PM.
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Old 06-30-04, 07:59 AM
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The site you show is biased against plastic and IMO is using scare tactics against its use. You have said you are also biased and will not use any plastic.

I am not a plumber and have never been a plumber. I do water line plumbing to install water treatment equipment and well pumps/pressure tanks. In my state I am not required to be licensed to do either. I know what the manufacturers of cement and plastic tubing say the minumum time frames are and I know why they say it and it is not to prevent taste problems as it seems you are saying. That's my opinion and as a user or plastics as compared to your opinion as a nonuser I think my opinion would seem to carry more weight as demonstrated here where you are saying the taste problem is due to the type of material and cement while he says: "A while back I had a plumber replace a cold water supply line (CPVC).".

He doesn't describe the taste and there are many other possibilities that could have changed the taste other than the new piece of tubing and its cement. I think we are making a mistake by automatically charging the type of tubing used as the culprit without looking for any other cause. And I'll bet that the millions of people using plastic water lines without having taste problems will agree with me.

Gary
Quality Water Associates
 
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Old 07-03-04, 05:09 PM
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The taste is from the lining inside the CPVC and PVC water pipes, some will notice it, some won't, I try not to ever install CPVC just cause of this.
 
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