Leaky outside spigot


  #1  
Old 06-30-04, 11:44 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: PA
Posts: 64
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Leaky outside spigot

I have an outside water spigot that is supposed to be of the "Frost Free" variety . My understanding is that the shutoff for this spigot is far enough inside that no water will freeze inside the spigot and it won't crack in winter. Well, at the end of SUMMER last year, this spigot started leaking. I don't know why. I took off the outer nut behind the handle, and cranked it as far closed as I could, and it still leaks.

My question is, do I have to replace the whole spigot? Is there anything I can check? It almost seems to be that somehow the valve inside is not closing properly and is allowing water to pass though. The spigot did not look maintenaceable to me.
 
  #2  
Old 06-30-04, 12:28 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
The washer that seals the faucet is at the very back end of the spigot where it screws into the line supplying the water to it. You will have to shut off the supply and unscrew the whole faucet and replace the washer. Even if you replace it you will have to do the same so save the money (these aren't cheap) and repair it.Good luck and post back.
 
  #3  
Old 06-30-04, 12:31 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,701
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
A "frost-free" spigot is sealed at the back of the faucet body with a rubber washer on the end of the long valve stem.
Remove the retaining cap, pull the valve stem out, and replace the washer.
Unless the faucet body itself has somehow gotten plugged up, has leaked, frozen and burst (I've had that happen), then this should fix it. Easy.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
  #4  
Old 06-30-04, 01:57 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: PA
Posts: 64
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Once I unscrew the retaining nut (I think I had it off already) do I just pull the valve straight out with a set of vice grips? It seemed to be in there pretty good.
 
  #5  
Old 06-30-04, 03:08 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,701
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
If you unscrew the retaining cap around the stem, it should just pull out. You shouldn't need vice grips.
Mike
 
  #6  
Old 06-30-04, 08:32 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: PA
Posts: 64
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
It pulled right out like you said. The rubber seal at the end was chewed up, causing the leak. I'm not sure what would have chewed it up. If the retaining nut is too tight, will it cause it? Anyways, I replaced it with one from a plumbing seal kit, and it seems to be ok for now.

Thanks for the help.
 
  #7  
Old 06-30-04, 08:51 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Northeastern NC On The Albemarle Sound
Posts: 10,701
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
No, the retaining nut will not chew up the washer. Go ahead and snug it up.
Over-tightening a "frost-free" is the usual reason that the washers get chewed up because water will always run out after it is actually sealed, and then most people just keep tightening the handle too tight. Don't do it, and the washer will last as it should.
Mike
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: