Changing out copper to PEX

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  #1  
Old 07-21-04, 07:29 AM
mstbone67a
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Smile Changing out copper to PEX

I am in the starts of overhaul of plumbing in my house. I have copper that has corrosion coming off almost every joint. I am going to replace it with pex.
I have some drawings I will be uploading soon and adding to this thread.

The facts

I have 3/4 copper coming into house from meter, which runs to the water heater and to upstairs. but before going upstairs it changes to 1/2 copper.

The hot side of the water heater comes off as 1/2 copper.

Reason I am doing this is the corrosion, and not enough water in master shower to wash wifes hair. (yes I didn't say pressure because that can be confused)
My plans are to replace the main line with 3/4 pex and make a sort of trunk line. I also plan to change out the 1/2 out from the water heater to 3/4. Then tie back into existing copper as needed which they will have 1/2 already.

Well thats it for now till I get these uploaded for everyone to see and advise.

thanks
thomas
 
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Old 07-22-04, 06:46 AM
mstbone67a
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Here are my diagrams

Existing

Planned

If I can get to the fixture I will bring Pex all the way to it. But if not I will use a sweat-pex adapter.


thanks
thomas
 
  #3  
Old 07-23-04, 11:48 AM
P
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I'm not a pro, but my understanding of PEX was that each fixture was homerunned (if that is a word) back to a supply manifold so that each fixture can be isolated individually.

Also means no connections in mid-run to worry about starting to leak - only at the supply manifold and at the fixture. Continuous pipe between these points.

In your "planned" diagram it looks like you are still using the traditional copper pipe branch style layout.

Again, I'm not a pro so this is just what I've picked up in my investigations on this.
 
  #4  
Old 07-23-04, 12:21 PM
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Wink

. I have copper that has corrosion coming off almost every joint. I am going to replace it with pex.
Re work it in copper. Corrosion there Ill bet someone just use cheap flux on it is all. Yes the 3/4 will let you have more flow. But if you have 1/2" to it now Id check out the faucets. Sounds like you have the right pipes in there now.

ED
 
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Old 07-27-04, 12:41 PM
mstbone67a
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Yep kinda making a trunk type layout. If I did the home run.. Would cost me more plus I can not reach all of the fixtures.

I have to measure the lengths.. but maybe I could just run most to a home-run type situation and tee off for a couple fixtures. like the 2 sinks off one line and toilets off another line

Since I have access to both showers currently (ONe is ripped out) I can re run both with home runs.

Also have access to under showers where existing copper is run. (another project--HVAC that was upgraded)

so I do understand my potential problem of more connections means more failure points. But my real question is .. how do i get more (pressure/flow) to that upstairs shower. 1/2 or 3/4?
 
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Old 07-27-04, 01:04 PM
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Wink

For sure you can get more flow up there with the 3/4"
But the psi will be the same.

ED
 
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Old 07-27-04, 01:19 PM
mstbone67a
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So which is it I need? when shower is on.. water just doesn't come out enough to rinse wife's hair.. guess it is kind of both eh? or one or the other right? Maybe you can set me straight

thanks
 
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Old 08-03-04, 06:27 PM
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Corroding copper solder joints do not equate to lowered pressure.






It is totally related to someone who initially soldered the copper fittings, failing to clean the piping once it was soldered.


The lack of pressure in the shower could be as simple as a $5 showerhead, let alone a rebuild of the valve itself, which could be contributed to lack of maintenance, hard water scale, dirt/debris in the valve or valve workings itself.



If you don't have your copper piping springing leaks like a sprinkler system, I would attack the source of the problem. Identify what areas of the house are not resembling the low pressure, find out if it is the main valve restricting water into the house, or possibly corroding dielectric unions on the water heater.



All of what I have mention will lead you to an answer of your water pressure issue.



Buy a gauge:


Water Gauge


Find out what your water pressure is with everything off in the house, including opening the valves briefly before testing pressure to remove thermal expansion buildup caused by the water heater.
 
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