barely any hot water pressure but good cold water pressure


  #1  
Old 10-13-04, 02:09 PM
bkallen14
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barely any hot water pressure but good cold water pressure

We barely have any hot water pressure from any of our faucets but we have good cold water pressure. OUr house is about 8 yrs old and we have made sure the valves are open. I am afraid that our pipes might be clogged we do have hard water. I also notice that when the shower is on and you turn on the kitchen faucet (on the same floor) the hot water pressure gets better and the water gets hotter. Is there an easy way to see if the pipes are clogged or is there anything we can do to figure out the problem before we have to get a plumber?

Thanks,

Kara
 
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Old 10-13-04, 04:11 PM
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What type of pipes do you have? Galvanized?
Is the cold water supply valve at the water heater fully open? Have you checked it to see if the washer on the end of the valve is O.K.?
Mike
 
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Old 10-13-04, 06:18 PM
bkallen14
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We have copper pipes. We opened the valve at the bottom of the water heater and there is definitely a lot of pressure because the water sprayed out a couple feet.
 
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Old 10-13-04, 06:39 PM
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Normally, hot water pressure out is driven by the cold water pressure into the tank.
If you have copper pipes, it shouldn't be a problem with the pipes, but at each fixture.
It's hard for me to imagine that every fixture would clog up on the hot water side only at about the same time, but anything can happen.
You can see if it's being caused by a mineral build-up by turning off the water and taking apart a hot water faucet to see if there is a white calcium deposit clogging it. If it's clogging one, it must be clogging the others.
Stanger things have happened.
Good LucK!
Mike
 
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Old 10-13-04, 08:16 PM
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If you have a valve on the hot water side that the handle keeps turning on and on and will not stop turning, you probably have a bad gate valve that is not actually open all the way. Also check for a ball valve that is not open all the way.

Unions on water heaters can become corroded and affect the hot water flow. Sometimes people use galvanized nipples on the outlet of water heaters. These can become corroded and reduce the water flow. Be aware that disimiliar metals are a source of problems (copper & galvanized).

Tracking down a problem like this will require a investigation on your part.

Good luck, and post back what you find.
 
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Old 10-13-04, 08:33 PM
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More Investigation Needed

Hello: Kara

I agree with Mike and Rainbird. More investigation is needed and stranger things have happened. I found that eact problem where a flex line out of a tank was pinched. Right there in plain view yet missed by someone whom the owner claimed was a pro plumber.

Of which I am not a plumber but there at the home because I work for a gas utility and the customer uses the compnay product. Check for a pinched line as well as the checks already offered. Especially gate valves, unions and non copper pipes used anywhere, as mentioned.

Also the valves under the counters or cabinets. Either may be clogged or not fully opened, etc. Faucets and the washers may be the cause. Check the water volume (Not pressure out of tank) into the tank, which is best done at the inlet and not at the flush valve on the tank.

Flush valve on tank subjected to pressure which caused the water blast you described. What is needed to know is the constant flow volume (flow rate) into the tank. Only way to know that is test out flow from the inlet pipe into the tank. May be a restriction of water into the tank before the shut off valve.

All of which can be done as a diy project but may need a pro whom does this plumbing type work daily. Even copper piping, installed poorly, can and does cause water restrictions. Rare but possible. Stranger things do happen.
 
 

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