roughing in basement bathroom


  #1  
Old 11-13-04, 08:50 AM
gyroking
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roughing in basement bathroom

This is a great site.
Busted up the concrete with a jack hammer. Carefully exposed sewer line. Rented a Hilti drill, and drilled 3/4" holes 4-6 inches apart,around the trench pattern, jackhammered a hole in the center of the trench, then jackhammered between the hilti holes ,to give the concrete somewhere to fracture to. It worked well, and not very dusty. Concrete is 50 years old. Spalling was not a major problem in my case.
What fitting to use under the concrete? Sewer line is 4" cast iron. Need to insert a 45 deg. wye into this line. Would the mission coupling be the best? What would be the best thing to do to minimize "hang up " spots, and to give the smoothest flow? Was looking at a coupling the other day that had a "solid" stainless steel clamp about 3" long. The rubber part had a shoulder inside, in the center approx 3/16" high. Is that a mission coupling? I read on the site that a fernco is not recommended to go under the concrete. What is the difference between the fernco and the mission couplings? Also, What is the difference between PVC and ABS? Am in Alberta, Canada. Thanks in advance.
 

Last edited by gyroking; 11-13-04 at 09:02 AM.
  #2  
Old 11-13-04, 09:02 AM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
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A Fernco is a neoprene rubber sleeve coupling held on by two large stainless steel hose clamps.
A Mission (aka no-hub) coupling has a stainless steel sleeve with a neoprene sleeve inside it, and is held by stainless steel torque clamps. A no-hub is obviously stronger than a Fernco.
Use a no-hub when transitioning from PVC white plastic or ABS black plastic to cast iron, especially under concrete. You can cut cast iron with a rented snapcutter made for the purpose or with a reciprocating saw with metal-cutting blades.
Good luck!
Mike
 
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Old 11-14-04, 05:08 PM
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Looks like you're into it similarly to me (I just posted my question). However, I used a 4 pound hammer and chisel to make my hole. Boy, are my muscles sore today! The home depot guy here in Vancouver suggested a 4X2 cast iron "wye" would be better than abs to tap into the 4" mainline. However, Home depot doesn't sell them. He also led me down the vent question path, which means I have to figure out that answer before going onwards.

By the way, ABS is black and is the normal stuff used for drainage around here (Vancouver, BC). PVC pipe is normally white. I've seen it in drainage sizes, but it seems to be used more for supply instead of copper in new houses and RV's. Though not a plumber, I understand that you should stay with one or the other (ABS or PVC), as the transition cement between the two is not the best solution.
 
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Old 11-15-04, 03:46 AM
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ABS is black plastic (drains only) and only ABS glue should be used.
PVC is white plastic (drains and cold water lines only) and only PVC primer and PVC glue should be used. PVC cannot be used for hot water supply lines.
There is a special cement made for connecting the two.
CPVC is off-white or light yellow plastic and CPVC glue should be used. CPVC can be used for hot and cold supply lines.
All fixture drain lines have to be vented after the traps (toilets have built-in traps) within a certain distance of the traps according to drain line size.
Check with your Building Inspection Department for local code, and permit and inspection requirements.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
 

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