Leaking supply line

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Old 01-16-05, 07:45 PM
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Leaking supply line

Below the sink are two flexible (chrome?) supply lines connected to the faucets above. Both are leaking at the connection or at least that's where the water drips. As I look at the tube connections, there are 3 copper nuts. If you look at tube connection from the bottom to the top, how or what do I tighten to stop the leaks? I can understand two nuts but why 3? Also in what direction, clockwise, or counterclockwise? Also how much to turn? Is it dangerous to tighten too much? Thanks for any help and sorry to be so non-descriptive but I don't know the names of the parts.
 
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Old 01-16-05, 07:57 PM
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Tighten the nut(s) wherever the leak is coming from. It sounds like you have a brass reducer in the supply valve and then a compression fitting on that. Tighten the top one clockwise. They should just be firm. The "chrome" lines are plated copper. Good luck and reply back with any other questions.
 
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Old 01-17-05, 05:10 PM
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So if the leak appears to be at the top nut, I should tighten that? As I look up at the nut, do I turn clockwise? Why would anyone put a pressure reducer on the line? our water pressure is minimal. Plate copper? who would have guessed. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-17-05, 05:30 PM
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Hold a backup wrench on the nut or fitting that you're turning against and turn the nut that you want to tighten counter-clockwise as you look at it under the sink if it's headed up, and clockwise if it's headed down.
Just FYI -
It isn't a pressure reducer, but a line size or connection reducer (such as 1/2" to 3/8").
Chromed plumbing fixtures (faucets, spouts, showerheads, etc.), lines and fittings are usually actually either chrome-plated copper or brass.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 01-21-05, 07:11 PM
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Smile

Thank you, thank you all--did just as you said and so far, no leaks!!! Didn't think I could do it. If it doesn't leak after two days, would you consider it free of leaks??? I was so afraid to turn the nuts too far. Are there not some cases in plumbing when you can turn too far and break something? Thanks again, project accomplished.
 
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Old 01-22-05, 07:16 AM
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The threads on compression fittings (what you just tightened) are fine threads. If you really crank on them you can strip them. They are also easily cross-threaded when you first start them. Toilets are the worst. If you over-tighten a bolt on them, you buy a new toilet. It's all a matter of touch.
Glad your project turned out.
 
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