Copper into John Guest fitting?

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  #1  
Old 03-02-05, 10:21 PM
kdkrone
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Copper tubing into John Guest fitting?

I have copper 1/4" tubing that goes to my icemaker. I am going to set up a manifold for an espresso machine (filter, ball valve, check valve, pressure reducer, etc.) and use mainly plastic John Guest fittings to put it together with a tee for the icemaker so that the filter serves the espresso machine and the icemaker.

Can I put the copper tubing directly into a female John Guest fitting or do I need to connect the copper to some plastic tubing and then put the plastic tubing into the JG fitting? (If the second choice, what do I need to connect the plastic tubing and the copper tubing?

(Actually, there is a second question, which is: is it a good idea to put the icemaker on the far side of the pressure reducer? I am going to reduce the pressure to 30psi at the suggestion of the espresso machine manufacturer--is that a good idea for icemakers, as well?)

Thanks
Ken K
 

Last edited by kdkrone; 03-03-05 at 06:57 AM.
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  #2  
Old 03-03-05, 09:41 PM
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I would use those stainless steel no burst icemaker connectors.



The solenoid on the icemaker is probably engineered for 50/60 pounds.




I hear they now make those fittings you describe in copper now with the rubber O-rings in them, but I am a firm believer of removing movable parts in a system where water pressure is at play.
 
  #3  
Old 03-04-05, 08:03 AM
kdkrone
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Dunbar plumber,

Thank you for your post. I was not clear about where the plastic John Guest fitting and the copper tubing were.

At the icemaker, there is a copper compression fitting which secures the copper tubing.

The feed for that tubing is in a closet about 15' away. At that point I intend to install a manifold that will have a water filter, a tee with a ball valve, a pressure reducer, and a check valve to which my 15' copper line to the refrigerator icemaker and a 12' 1/4" plastic hose to my espresso machine will be attached.

My question is can I attach the 1/4" copper tubing directly into the John Guest 1/4" fitting or should I use a copper compression fitting to attach the tubing beyond the check valve? In actual fact, I may not have enough length of my copper tubing to connect back to the check valve and then the question would be how to make that connection. That raises the question of how to make a connection between a plastic fitting, 4-5" of plastic tubing, and 1/4" tubing?

What I gather from your response is that there may now be a copper fitting similar to the John Guest fitting, so I will check that out.

I also gather from your answer that you do not use plastic hose and prefer copper or galvanized pipe for all of your plumbing, or do I misunderstand you? "I am a firm believer of removing movable parts in a system where water pressure is at play."

Thanks
Ken K
 
  #4  
Old 03-04-05, 08:31 PM
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I would never recommend galvanized piping. That material is prone to failure.



What I am trying to convey is that you need to stick with one type of material, go with that and use all of it in the same way.


The transition of materials is unnecessary and can be avoided if you stick to similar materials.



That is why I mentioned those stainless steel 1/4" flex supplies. Yes, you will have spent more money, but you are condensing everything to match and using durable materials.


That plastic/copper mix is asking for problems, and most times I walk into these situations working at all the Subway's in my town, resulting in tearing it all out and doing it in the above fashion.

Mixing up materials spells disaster and 20 trips to the supply house. I don't care much for those push-fit fittings for the reason that movement or slight pulling on them could result in leaks. Even soft copper has its drawbacks with the connections if moved/disturbed.


I would trust an all brass compression union before any push-fit O-ring connection involving water pressure of any amount.
 
  #5  
Old 03-04-05, 09:52 PM
kdkrone
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<
The transition of materials is unnecessary and can be avoided if you stick to similar materials.>>

I understand now. My situation is that I was going to build my manifold in plastic, as the cation exchanger and carbon filter housings were in plastic with John Guest connectors and the tubing running to the espresso machine was going to be plastic. The only component that would not be "like" is the copper tubing, so the question is how to best make that connection. At some point I have to make the transition and I am not sure where the safest point would be.

Thanks
Ken
 
  #6  
Old 03-04-05, 10:36 PM
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In that case then, I would remove the copper and go plastic the entire way,,,,,,,using a compression fitting to join the 2 plastic pipes together.
 
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