Leaking shut off valve to galvanized pipe

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Old 03-03-05, 08:54 AM
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Leaking shut off valve to galvanized pipe

I have a shut-off valve, Brass Craft, under the kitchen sink which is leaking, slow drip, cold water side. The valve is attached to a piece of galvanized pipe coming from the wall. The leak looks like it is between the valve and galvanized pipe. The two pieces are rusted together. So I would want to replace the shut-off valve and the piece of galvanized pipe going into the wall. The pipe inside the wall is copper. I don't know how the galvanized pipe is attached to the copper pipe in the wall, hopefully screwed in. Can the galvanized pipe be unscrewed and replace with a new piece of pipe and a new shut-off valve? What would I need to put on the the threads to seal them between the copper and galvaized, and between the galavnized and shut-off valve. I don't want a leak inside the wall that I can't see. And I don't want to break anything inside the wall when I removed the pipe. I had a similar problem, different house, with the toilet shut-off, but had a plumber fix it. I didn't watch him, but it didn't take more then 15 minutes. I know he replaced the galvnized pipe coming out from the wall and put on a new shut-off valve. Why do they put a piece of galvanized pipe between the pipes inside the wall, copper, and the shut-off valves outside? The house is 20 years old. Well I have this problem with the other shut-off valves as the house ages?
 
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Old 03-03-05, 09:10 AM
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charlieabby, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
I, too, wonder why they used a galvanized nipple. I would use a piece of copper pipe with a male threaded adapter sweat onto it and either a sweat or compression valve on the other end. Threads on iron pipe take away half of the wall thickness so thats where they rust out first. If you have copper lines then there is a female adapter sweat on the end and the galvanized screwed into it. Use about 4 wraps of teflon tape or pipe dope compound on the new fitting and screw it in.
When two different metal materials are used together, you get electrolosis. This eats away at the material. It is usually seen as a white coating at the junction of the two metals.
If you have doubts about sweating the copper, we can walk you through that process also. Good luck.
 
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Old 03-06-05, 05:48 PM
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I went to Home Depot to get the copper parts, but the Home Depot guy said that was a lot of work and suggest I get a brass nipple, instead of galvanized. Being lazy and not knowing how to solder the copper I got the brass nipple. Is this okay? Another question can you over tighten the parts. I still have a small leak between the brass nipple and the new shut-off valve. Do I tighen until the leaks stop. Or take the shut-off valve off and put more teflon tap on and reassemble and hope it doesn't leak. Any help is much appreciated.
 
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Old 03-07-05, 04:17 AM
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The brass should be okay. Yes, you can overtighten fittings. Take it apart and use about 3 to 4 wraps of tape and reassemble. Pipe threads and fittings have tapered threads so when the tapers match up then only a small amount of pressure more should be fine. Good luck.
 
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