Is a flexible water supply line a good idea?

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  #1  
Old 03-08-05, 11:02 AM
Mr_Meat
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Is a flexible water supply line a good idea?

Okay here is the story in brief:

I am installing a new faucet in my kitchen. The existing supply lines did not have shut off valves so I called a plumber to install them for me. Several hundred dollars later I now have flexible (plastic?) hoses attached to the pipes under the house ending in shut off valves. The plumber told me that the new hoses were durable, immune to rust, etc. Was this a good idea or should I have insisted on metal pipes?
 
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Old 03-08-05, 11:22 AM
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Mr_Meat, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
Not sure what those flexible lines are made of. Could be PEX. That is a great material. Hundreds of dollars? Plumber must have had to do a lot to install them. When you take the final cost and divide by material, labor and travel time....it may not be that unreasonable. YES, you have to pay travel time costs. It may be written into the bid or added to the service call price.
 
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Old 03-08-05, 12:34 PM
Mr_Meat
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Looking at the side of the hoses, PEX is part of the labeling. As for a lot of work to install, the plumber had to crawl approximately 60 feet along a 2' high crawl space underneath my home, then drill through the floor of my kitchen cabinet. I doubt travel was part of the bid since I live in the city. Now for the potentially embarassing part - $850.00 too high?
 

Last edited by Mr_Meat; 03-08-05 at 12:49 PM.
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Old 03-08-05, 12:41 PM
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Travel is always added in somewhere as the owner of the company has to pay the help by the hour whether he is working or traveling. The price...I would say thats a bit stiff but I wasn't there.
 
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Old 03-08-05, 12:49 PM
Mr_Meat
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Well whats done is done. Gracias for your input.
 
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Old 03-14-05, 08:38 AM
Mr_Meat
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Okay this is turning into a saga...

Since having the work done I have realized a new problem. The dishwasher that stands adjacent to the sink now has no water supply. I can only imagine that the plumber somehow blocked the line when installing the new piping and valves. Does this theory sound reasonable? I called to have them come back out and they are telling me it will cost $60.00 to diagnose the problem. Any suggestions on what I should say to them?
 
  #7  
Old 03-14-05, 08:55 AM
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Tell them that the line worked BEFORE they did whatever it was and they need to make it work now. No charges. They screwed it up, they fix it.
 
  #8  
Old 03-14-05, 09:14 AM
Mr_Meat
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Thats what I was thinking - I just needed a second opinion. Thanks again.
 
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