Installing 2-bowl sink & disposal:

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Old 03-10-05, 07:09 AM
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Installing 2-bowl sink & disposal:

A couple of questions:

1. I've looked at a few illustrations, they all show the larger main bowl with the disposal attached on the RIGHT. Is this standard? Any reason it couldn't be switched around?

2. Just Checking: The disposal is attached under the main bowl, the dishwasher drain line is attached to the disposal. The drain from the disposal runs over to underneath the second bowl, a t-joint, then the usual run to the wall drain.
Correct???

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 03-10-05, 08:19 AM
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There is no set standard for which bowl you put the disposer on. Funny though, I have always installed them on the left bowl as thats where the customer wanted them.
You are correct on the rest of your post. Good luck.
 
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Old 03-10-05, 09:51 AM
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Follow up questions:

1. If the double-bowl sink has one larger bowl and one smaller bowl, is there a "standard practice" for which bowl gets the disposal?

2. I read somewhere about a "baffle tee" to prevent gunk from the disposal backing up into the other bowl. Could you tell me what this is, if it is necessary, and where it would go?

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-10-05, 10:01 AM
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Unless there is a difference in the size of the strainer basket/drain it makes no difference which side it goes on. Personal preference prevails.
I have never heard of a baffle tee but would be opposed to installing anything that blocks a drain pipe for any reason. You could always put the basket in the other bowl while you are running the disposal if you were worried about a back-up. Would not hurt anything.
Personal opinion: I have great affection for the Spin & Grin strainer baskets. They lock in with a twist and do not allow leakage or backflow as others do.
 
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Old 03-12-05, 08:04 PM
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Just out of curiosity,

I went to another site, www.plbg.com, and asked the same question about a "baffle tee" when installing a double bowl sink.

Two plumbers there tremendously disagree. One says that you MUST have one, he's never seen a 2-bowl installation without one, the other says he deliberately avoids them because they might block the drain.

I asked the question this morning, same name, oldberkeley.
 
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Old 03-13-05, 06:22 AM
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These are the answers you get online due to the different areas where the answers come from. Codes vary from State to State and locally also. Most codes serve a purpose. As stated, I would not put anything in a drain that would block the flow in any way. If done, anytmne you get a slow drain or clog, you have to remove the baffle tee to work on it. Good luck.
 
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Old 03-14-05, 09:04 AM
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Not a plumber...never heard of a baffle Tee. However, I thought my experience when we moved into our new house (17 years ago) might be worth relating here.

We had a severe problem with backup in the second sink when the disposal was used. It would even pop the stopper out sometimes. The plumbing contractor came out and put a second trap on that sink. Now, each sink has its own separate trap. I have no idea whether it is acceptable as far as current code is concerned, but it definitely solved our problem. Now, the only thing we have to do is remember to run water in the other sink periodically to compensate for evaporation. We only use that side for a dish drain.
 
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Old 03-14-05, 09:14 AM
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Randy, Although not normally done due to cost, a second trap is actually a good idea. When houses are built, future concerns are seldom addressed. You, as an owner have to deal with their shortcomings.
 
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