Broken PVC Irrigation Pipe

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Old 03-30-05, 04:49 AM
skaz421
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Broken PVC Irrigation Pipe

I discovered a broken pipe in my lawn irrigation system. I cut out the broken section, and I bought 2 fittings and a length of new pipe. I cemented the 2 new connectors onto the existing pipe.

How do I install the replacement pipe? When I cut it to the correct length, I can't insert it into the new connectors - it's too long. There's no side-to-side "play" in the existing pipe. Do I try to move the existing pipe sideways, to fit the new pipe into the fitting?

It's the first time I'm working with PVC.

Thanks
 
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Old 03-31-05, 05:44 AM
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If you have any play at all use it.

Otherwise, you will need to build an assembly that look like an expansion joint. It involves 4 elbows and 3 short pieces of pipe. Just glue an elbow on each end of the existing pipe both facing the same direction. Then glue in a 2 inch nipple in these elbows. Now take and glue the other 2 elbows on the last remaining piece which is cut to length to fit onto the elbows on the existing pipe. Glue the elbows onto the the short nipples on the existing pipe. Repair made...

Another fix... Use a mechanical compression coupler made for water on 1 end and a glued coupler on the other. The mechanical coupler has more play for moving to proper position before you tighten it in place. Place the parts of the mechanical coupler in place (but loose) before you glue the other end of the repair piece in place. When glued in place, you then put the mechanical couple together and seal that end.

A couple of fixes for you to consider...Have fun and good luck.
 
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Old 03-31-05, 06:34 AM
J
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Usually, you can dig a few feet either side of the break and lift each pipe far enough to allow the new piece to fit. Then as you push the pipes down the new pipe will slide into each of your couplings.

Note that if this is the thin wall pvc you may end up with more leaks and breaks in the future. I prefer to use only schedule 40. Also you might want to check the water pressure. My water utility recently did some work and increased our pressure from 85 psi up to 140 psi. Since I didn't have pressure regulators on the landscape system I blew out a few fittings. Then I had to go and get pressure regulators to cut the pressure down so things would work correctly.
 
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Old 03-31-05, 07:18 AM
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Wink

Id check around there on the PVC for what you can do. I know here we have a compression fitting that you can just slip over the pipe and tighten. Then the one I like for this is the PVC glue on coupling. That has no stop in it. You like mark on each pipe where it should be. slip it all the way over one pipe. Cut a pipe to fit to there glue it to the other end now put PVC glue on the pipe end heavy and slide the coupling over the end to the marks

ED
 
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Old 03-31-05, 01:13 PM
J
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc
The one I like for this is the PVC glue on coupling. That has no stop in it. You like mark on each pipe where it should be. slip it all the way over one pipe. Cut a pipe to fit to there glue it to the other end now put PVC glue on the pipe end heavy and slide the coupling over the end to the marks

ED
That's cool

My problem is that I've never seen one of these couplings. Where do you get them?
 
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Old 03-31-05, 01:35 PM
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Wink

Home depot had them here dont know about lowes. I guess you could cut the stop line out of a coupling. Bet they dont carry them cause they can sell the double end pvc compression fitting for a lot more $$$$. It will slide over the pipe and back on the other pipe

ED
 
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Old 03-31-05, 09:07 PM
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PVC compression couplings are not used much anymore. Most all sprinkler installers use the Slip-Fix Repair Coupling. They are available in sizes to fix all size pipes. To repair a break in PVC line, simply cut out the break to the size of the repair coupling. Glue one end of the coupling to the pipe and then apply glue to the other end of the pipe and coupling. Expand the coupling to fill the void. Easy and fast. Here is a picture of one:
http://www.horizononline.com/product...ct.phtml/QF007
 
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