Re-Piping Advise Needed

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  #1  
Old 04-10-05, 11:00 PM
diyfanatic
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Thumbs up Re-Piping Advise Needed

Recently bought my first property, and as you may have guesses it wasn't new. It's a 1950's rancher w/ galvanized piping.

I have very low pressure and horrible water taste, especially after it hasn't been turned on for a while.

I've talked to the neighbors and they have re-piped their house a couple years ago for the same reasons. Current piping doesn't leak (yet) and seems to be in ok shape on the outside.

I was wondering how realistic it would be for me to get this done all by my self in 1-2 days. I've never done any real plumbing before but think of my self as being handy. What things should I watch out for and what should I consider before I begin this job. Which tools or materials are better to use.

Thanks in advance for your advice.
 
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Old 04-12-05, 05:46 AM
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Plumbing would be fairly straight forward. Several choices for replacement material; copper, plastic, pex. All require a certain amount of tools to work with so do you have the proper tools to start with just for the plumbing.

How good are you at sheetrock repair? Any walls that need to be opened for pipe exposure. The little stops on the lav and toilet, do they come out of the wall or through the floor? What about the tub and shower valve, replace that? Need to have tille work or a surround installed?

Carpentry work with kitchen cabinets? How does the water lines get to the sink?

Do you have the tools for these jobs?

I'm sure others will chime in...

Not trying to shoot down your idea, I just want your eyes open for ALL the work required. Let us know how everything is going and ask questions if you have any problems. There are many people here who will give good and free advise, use it to your advantage.

Good luck with your project.

I edited this for a fairly important question I forgot to ask. DO YOU HAVE A BASEMENT OR A SLAB? Your response will change this from easy to harder to do. Okay, now I'm done....
 
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Old 04-12-05, 04:00 PM
diyfanatic
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Thanks for those questions, makes me realize things I have not thought about.

Plumbing would be fairly straight forward. Several choices for replacement material; copper, plastic, pex. All require a certain amount of tools to work with so do you have the proper tools to start with just for the plumbing.

I was thinking of going w/ copper piping, are there any advantages of using other materials you listed?

How good are you at sheetrock repair? Any walls that need to be opened for pipe exposure. The little stops on the lav and toilet, do they come out of the wall or through the floor? What about the tub and shower valve, replace that? Need to have tille work or a surround installed?

My sheetrock repair is so-so, but I'm not too woried about that since I won't have too much of that. All piping comes out of the walls. Tub/shower pipes have been replaced by previous owner when he remodeled the bathroom, so that saves me quite a bit of headaches.

Carpentry work with kitchen cabinets? How does the water lines get to the sink?

Kithen is hooked up behind a cabinet w/ wall exposed on the back end of the cabinet, I will have to cut that piece out to expose piping for kitchen as well as piping for one of my bathrooms (including bath tub/shower pipes) located behind kitchen wall.

Do you have the tools for these jobs?

Hmm, I have some hand tools, pipe wreches, saws. utility knifes ect. besided a torch for my piping what else would I need?

I edited this for a fairly important question I forgot to ask. DO YOU HAVE A BASEMENT OR A SLAB? Your response will change this from easy to harder to do. Okay, now I'm done....

I have a fairly roomy crawl space about 4-1/2 feet deep.
 
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Old 04-12-05, 06:40 PM
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Copper would be first choice for me.

Pex needs some special crimper tools but it is extremely easy to install. Check with local code folks and see if it is legal in your area. Then look up Vanguard brand to find local distributor. Manifolds and direct runs to fixtures make for a very fast repipe. There is also a certain amount of freeze protection against bursting due to the pex stretching as it freezes. There are metal plates that need to be installed inside the walls to protect the pipe where it comes through floor sill plates so you will need to open the walls a little more to install these. Souix Chief makes stub out plates with the outlets built in so you may want to look at these. Just some thoughts on pex...

CPVC is the plastic pipe used. This is just a personal point with me, but I would never use the stuff. I see many people who do and thousands of miles of the pipe is installed in homes so it does have a market. It's easy to install also. Cut to proper length, sand joint and glue...it's that simple. There are a million fittings for absolutely every application so it has been made pretty much idiot proof. I just have a problem with it being plastic. When it freezes, it forms very long cracks that spray water just everywhere when it thaws... But it is very easy to repair.

You need a decent torch, a fitting brush. and a good tubing cutter for copper.
Pex will need a 3/4" and 1/2" crimping tool (you can rent these) and a sharp knife.
A saw, some sandpaper, and the proper primer with glue for CPVC.

Other tools are a tape measure, level, hammer or screw driver (depends on your pipe hanges).

Crawl space or basement makes this a very easy job. Slab would be bad as pipes would come through attic. To remove the old pipes, get a sawzall with a metal cutting blade and just start cutting out long sections. A battery powered saw is best...why you ask...use a ground fault interupter extension cord if you use an electric sawzall. Water and electricity are bad. Wear eye protection using safety googles and beware of metal slivers that collect on the upper part of the safety googles.

You have some info, make your plan, and if you have more questions, ask and someone will answer you.
 
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Old 04-12-05, 08:57 PM
diyfanatic
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Thanks notuboo,

This is a lot of great information that gives me a much clearer picture as to what to expect. I'll be sure to post the outcome of this project when it's all done. But it doesn't seem to be too difficult of a task, but I'm sure there is more to it then what I imagine, there always is .

Thanks again,
-Paul
 
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