Washing Machine Discharge Hose Foams !

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Old 04-11-05, 08:32 PM
red73mustang
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Washing Machine Discharge Hose Foams !

Hi, I’m new here and I hope I can contribute, but right now my headache is my laundry discharge hose "foams” and bubble over at the opening of the recessed laundry box my "plumber" friend put in. House is 4 years old and has city sewers. Discharge hose is 9 inches higher than the drain and has 8-9 feet of travel (PVC pipe) from laundry box to drain tie in. It did not do this when the drain tube was lower and actually had a shorter run to the drain!. Would a longer discharge hose solve this to provide some slack or reduce pressure ?

Thanks, Chet
 
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Old 04-12-05, 05:24 AM
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Let's make the assumption the "plumber" knew all about venting. A 2 inch line has to be vented at no more than 6 feet from the stack. (We'll also assume the "plumber" put in a 2 inch line)

What happens when a drain line is too long without a vent, it doesn't work very well as it works as a siphon instead of draining normal and flowing freely. This siphon effect makes it slow and sluggish which in you case, has soap foam coming backwards and out the drain inlet.

If a vent was installed, and everything is in place as it really should be with proper pipe sizes; then you have a partial line blockage.

Hope this helps and if you have more questions, ask away and someone will answer them.
 
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Old 04-12-05, 06:16 AM
red73mustang
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Thanks for the reply notuboo, I don't suspect any blockages so I will investigate the "venting" solution. I fear that a vent was not factored in as he was just using all kinds of crazy 2 inch fittings that he had laying around. What exactly is a a vent and where (in the run to the 2 inch drain pipe) should it be installed ?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-12-05, 07:09 PM
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A vent is a pipe that allows air to enter the drain system so it will drain properly. There are dry vents and wet vents, but that is all you need to know here.

The very easiest fix for you may or may not be legal, codewise. You need to ask a local code/building inspector if Studor vents (also called quickie vent) are allowed in the drain system. If yes, IF YES, cut a 2 inch tee into the existing drain line no more than 6 feet from the stack. Have the side outlet pointing upward and place (glue) a piece of pipe in that joint that rises vertically 6 inches above the top of the existing inlet of the washer standpipe (this is where the hose goes into the drain). At this level, place the studor vent. The vent needs to be in an accessable location which basically means you can see it without to much difficulity.

If no on the Studor vent, you will still need to cut in the tee. you will still run the pipe up to the same level as the studor vent. You will then place an elbow on the pipe with it heading back towards the stack. You will need to cut in a sanitary tee on the stack and tie in the new vent pipe into the tee. More work and it can be more difficult if there are upstairs plumbing fixtures tied into same stack.

Good luck with your project....
 
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