Plumbing for refrigerator ice maker


  #1  
Old 08-02-05, 12:01 PM
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Question Plumbing for refrigerator ice maker

This may be a bit of a long explanation but I am hoping that by describing the entire situation I can get some good ideas.

We have a small entry room from our attached garage before you enter the kitchen. In this entry room, side by side, are the refrigerator and a built in cabinet. They are the only things on that particular wall and there is no room for anything else. Our washer and dryer are out in the garage (which is heated for winter use). Our basement does not run under the garage so the plumbing for the washer actually comes up into the base of the above cabinet and then runs up along the back before traveling along a shelf to go out through the wall to the washer. The cold water pipe has a leak that we didn't catch right away and so now we are going to just tear out the whole cabinet and redo the plumbing and put in a new cabinet. This time we plan to run the pipes behind the toe kick of the new cabinet and into the wall where they can travel up and out to the washer so we will no longer have visible pipes in our cabinet.

We plan to get a nice new refrigerator in the near future. One that has an ice maker and maybe water dispenser. We would like to plan ahead for this eventuality. When looking in books and so forth it looks like you take the waterline from the fridge and use a saddle (correct term?) fitting that taps into an existing cold water pipe to get water for the fridge. So, should we just leave a hole in the base of the cabinet next to the fridge so that we can run the waterline from the fridge down under the cabinet to hook it up to the pipe under there since we can remove the toe kick for access? Or should we run an offshoot pipe behind the fridge and have it capped for easier access for the fridge line? Will a dead-end pipe like this be okay or will gunk collect there and instead we should just do a little circuit that leaves the main pipe under the cabinet and goes to the fridge, then makes a U-turn and then returns to the main pipe to keep the water flowing?

We just want to have everything ready for future so we have less retrofitting to do.

Thanks,

Kirsten
 
  #2  
Old 08-02-05, 02:05 PM
oneeyeddog333
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Originally Posted by nitmast
This may be a bit of a long explanation but I am hoping that by describing the entire situation I can get some good ideas.

We have a small entry room from our attached garage before you enter the kitchen. In this entry room, side by side, are the refrigerator and a built in cabinet. They are the only things on that particular wall and there is no room for anything else. Our washer and dryer are out in the garage (which is heated for winter use). Our basement does not run under the garage so the plumbing for the washer actually comes up into the base of the above cabinet and then runs up along the back before traveling along a shelf to go out through the wall to the washer. The cold water pipe has a leak that we didn't catch right away and so now we are going to just tear out the whole cabinet and redo the plumbing and put in a new cabinet. This time we plan to run the pipes behind the toe kick of the new cabinet and into the wall where they can travel up and out to the washer so we will no longer have visible pipes in our cabinet.

We plan to get a nice new refrigerator in the near future. One that has an ice maker and maybe water dispenser. We would like to plan ahead for this eventuality. When looking in books and so forth it looks like you take the waterline from the fridge and use a saddle (correct term?) fitting that taps into an existing cold water pipe to get water for the fridge. So, should we just leave a hole in the base of the cabinet next to the fridge so that we can run the waterline from the fridge down under the cabinet to hook it up to the pipe under there since we can remove the toe kick for access? Or should we run an offshoot pipe behind the fridge and have it capped for easier access for the fridge line? Will a dead-end pipe like this be okay or will gunk collect there and instead we should just do a little circuit that leaves the main pipe under the cabinet and goes to the fridge, then makes a U-turn and then returns to the main pipe to keep the water flowing?

We just want to have everything ready for future so we have less retrofitting to do.

Thanks,

Kirsten
it would be better if you ran a line behind the fridge and use an angle stop so that it can be more accesiable to shut it off
 
  #3  
Old 08-02-05, 03:15 PM
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Forget the saddle valve and do the job right.

Cut a tee into a convient cold water line and then stub out a short piece of pipe and then a valve. A quarter turn angle valve or ball valve would be ideal for this and then you are good to go when you want to run the water line.
 
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Old 08-02-05, 08:57 PM
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Okay. I didn't even realize that was a possibility. Sounds great to me. I have one question about the valve what size should the outlet side be? Should I look for one with a special fitting that would fit typical fridge water line? I am pretty good at doing the plumbing but I don't know all the possibilities out there and I know that valves have confused me in the past (i.d. vs. o.d. measurements and the wide variety of types).

Thanks both of you for your help!

Kirsten
 
  #5  
Old 08-03-05, 12:07 PM
oneeyeddog333
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Originally Posted by nitmast
Okay. I didn't even realize that was a possibility. Sounds great to me. I have one question about the valve what size should the outlet side be? Should I look for one with a special fitting that would fit typical fridge water line? I am pretty good at doing the plumbing but I don't know all the possibilities out there and I know that valves have confused me in the past (i.d. vs. o.d. measurements and the wide variety of types).

Thanks both of you for your help!

Kirsten

use 1/2''idx1/4''od valve that is ice maker line size
 

Last edited by oneeyeddog333; 08-03-05 at 12:09 PM. Reason: spelling
 

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