ABS Tee replacement


  #1  
Old 08-16-05, 10:58 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
ABS Tee replacement

Hello everyone,

First time renovator taking the plunge... I am currently renovating my kitchen, which involves moving the sink from a corner sink-base cabinet to the center in a U-Shaped Kitchen. Because of this, I need to remove the ABS pipe which came out from behind the drywall into the old corner cabinet. Since the existing pipe behind the drywall has a vertical pipe going straight down to the basement, and there are existing connections to the vent pipe, I need to maintain the ABS structure in its current location. However, I need to change the direction (currently the Tee is perpendicular/coming out of the drywall) of the existing Tee by 90 degrees (new Tee would have to be parallel to the wall) so I can run a new 4 feet section of ABS through several studs right to the middle of the U-shape, and come out where my new sink-base cabinet is located (in the middle of the U shaped kitchen).

Now the big questions:
1. If I cut out the existing Tee, my new Tee would be of the same length, how do I go about fitting the both ends to my new Tee? Would I simply cut out a bigger section and use couplers?

2. I have to remove the existing drywall, and drill holes through the studs, and ensuring the appropriate slope. How difficult is it to insert a 4-feet ABS pipe through 3 studs? Will bending the pipe cause problem in the stability/longevity of the ABS pipe?

3. I need to fit a 4 foot section (at 1/4" per foot slope) to end at the new Tee, how do I ensure it will fit snugly if there is a slight angle, and the pipes are not truly perpendicular at 90 degrees? Is this a problem or am I worrying too much?

How do the experienced folks deal with these situations?

Thanks for your help

Timon
 
  #2  
Old 08-17-05, 05:58 AM
notuboo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Kansas City MO
Posts: 1,699
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
#1. You have the idea. Cut out a little more than the tee, say 2 inches on each side. Then reuse that tee with couplers unless the trap adapter was installed where you can not couple the new drain line.

#2. Maybe a big problem. Check with your local code about how much you can bore and how many studs you can go through. If this is a bearing wall or an exterior wall, my code only allows 25% for a bored hole and only 2 studs. This may throw you to plan 'B'. Bending the pipe for installation is not the big deal, keeping it bent after it is in place causes problems. If the pipe needs to be bent to fit properly, (with the bend remaining) you need to install the proper fitting so the pipe is under no stress.

#3. I'll make the assumption you are concerned about joining an angle pipe with a true vertical tee. ABS piping is drainage piping. ABS fittings have angles built into the fittings for fittings that go together just one way. For fittings such as a tee, the socket is slightly oversized so the angle is still built in, the installer just has to install the pipe properly while 'glueing' the sections together. PVC piping, on the other hand, does not do this as it is considered water supply and drainage pipe.
Bottom line, do not fret over this too much.

Good luck with your project...
 
  #3  
Old 08-18-05, 10:00 AM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 141
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
#2 - see if the "Stud Shoe" from Simpson ( Stud Shoe ) meets local codes. It is available through the orange store by special order. Other manufacturers may have something equivalent, I only have experience with Simpson.

Since this is a kitchen it may not be a structural load wall for the house, but if it has upper cabinets mounted on it then it will be carrying a load. I would consider carefully any unreinforced holes and notches in the studs.
 
  #4  
Old 08-18-05, 01:20 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Great answers- follow up question

Thanks notuboo and PenguinDave... Your answers help greatly.

I have a follow up question:

Now that I have cut out the original Tee, I see that there is a "literally" layer of mud (almost as think as the ABS pipe itself) in the ABS pipe. This is only seen below the Tee, above it the pipe looks like brand new as it is connected to the air vent pipe that goes to the roof upstairs. The layer of stuff I assume is a result of many years of use, and is likely waste that went down the sinks and never got washed out and attached to the pipe.

Is it a good time for me to replace the entire pipe, or is it not worth my while? I am worried that eventually, the pipe will be clogged up and I'll have to get my hands dirty again. This old kitchen is about 15 years.

Thanks in advance guys!
Timon
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: