Is it ok to replace compression stop valve?


  #1  
Old 08-28-05, 11:31 AM
augmendoza
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Is it ok to replace compression stop valve?

I recently replaced all the hardware in one of our toilets. In doing so, the supply line made of metal flex tubing snapped as I tried to re-attach.

The angular stop valve that it is attached to seems to be fused solid to the metal flex tube. So I am prepared to replace the existing valve and attach to the existing copper compression fitting.

The dilemma: I've been told that attempting to re-use the copper compression connection and just simply screwing a new angle valve in place will result in a possible leaky connnection. The rationale is that the copper ring had previously made a unique connection when it was compressed into the soft copper piping.

I really don't want this to be true because I'm not sure if I there will be enough pipe left out of the wall after I saw the former connection off.

Any thoughts?
 
  #2  
Old 08-28-05, 06:02 PM
W
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Hi, Just use the old nut and furrel on the pipe. MAKE SURE THE THREADS ARE THE SAME try the new nut on the old angle stop. If they match install it on the pipe. Close the angle stop turn the main back on and check for leaks.I use paper on the floor to check. 99 percent of the time it wont leak.
Don't forget to buy a flex line one side to fit the toilet and the other to fit the size of your angle stop. Also get the correct length.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
  #3  
Old 08-29-05, 01:05 PM
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Replacing compression valve

Woodbutcher is on the right page, if you can get a valve that fits the existing nut you are home free. If you have a problem with matching the threads all is not lost. Take a hack-saw blade with the teeth facing you, proceed on the pull stroke on the top of the ferrule to score it. Once you get a groove in it, take a small screwdriver and drive it into the groove, be gentle, the ferrule should crack, remove, get new ferrule and reinstall. Put a little pipe compound on the threads If the supply line is the problem, go to your local depot and get a new supply that will screw on to the valve and the toilet. Luck.
 
  #4  
Old 09-03-05, 09:41 PM
noisaw
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Originally Posted by augmendoza
I recently replaced all the hardware in one of our toilets. In doing so, the supply line made of metal flex tubing snapped as I tried to re-attach.

The angular stop valve that it is attached to seems to be fused solid to the metal flex tube. So I am prepared to replace the existing valve and attach to the existing copper compression fitting.

The dilemma: I've been told that attempting to re-use the copper compression connection and just simply screwing a new angle valve in place will result in a possible leaky connnection. The rationale is that the copper ring had previously made a unique connection when it was compressed into the soft copper piping.

I really don't want this to be true because I'm not sure if I there will be enough pipe left out of the wall after I saw the former connection off.

Any thoughts?
I usualy don't have a problem if I use pepe dope on the connecting. I've been doing it this way for the last decade.
 
  #5  
Old 09-04-05, 08:50 AM
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You do have to carefully compare the old and new valve. If one is coarse thread and the other is fine, you must remove the ferrule. But if they are the same, I prefer to leave the ferrule in place on the pipe. It has established a 'home' there and it is best not to disturb it. The ferrule will usually seal into the new valve OK. I agree with the 99% figure. Do not overtighten. Hand tight, then 1/2 to 3/4 turn by wrench. If it feels snug and the valve cannot be rotated on the pipe by hand, turn the water on. If you have a drip you can tighten in 1/4 turn increments.
 
 

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