Shower - What should be done for inspection?


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Old 09-03-05, 10:49 AM
underwood
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Shower - What should be done for inspection?

I'm finfshing my basement and installing bathroom with shower and a wet bar.
I have all drains in place but did not do anything with supply lines - they running right here on the ceiling.
Could you tell me what should be done before I can call for rought-in inspection? Like should I run the water supply pipes to the sink locations and to the shower fixture?
Thanks
 
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Old 09-03-05, 11:07 AM
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I would call the inspection office and ask. Different localities have different requirements. I never did much remodeling and on new construction the waterlines were run to the area of the fixture and capped off for the rough-in inspection. Good luck.
 
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Old 09-03-05, 11:44 AM
underwood
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Thanks for the instant reply.
I will call an inspector after the weekend. I just wanted to finish my plumbing till then. I understand that I will need to run the pipes to fixture locations anyhow.
By the way, I have couple of questions the books or internet could not answer so far :
1.) All places showing cooper pipes installation for shower. I believe in our house our builder used all plastic piping for everything. So can I use CPVC pipes for my new bathroom or cooper is the way to go?
2.) If shut-off valves are required for shower supply lines and also, should I buy the shower fixture first so I will know how to run these pipes?
Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 09-03-05, 12:00 PM
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If all the other piping is CPVC, I would continue with it. I am "old school" and use copper whenever I can, but this is a choice. I have not seen a code requiring shut-off valves for a shower (although I think there should be). The shut-off valves can be located right after the supply lines come off the main. That way you do not need an access door for them. Speaking of access panels, if you are going to tile or use a one piece unit, I would heavily consider one for future use. Tearing out walls or tile later is a pain that can be easily avoided. Most shower valves I have seen must be fed from the bottom. This will mean going down with your supply lines and then back up to the valve. Some valves even have a specific distance the piping has to be run under them. Guess you will want to buy the valve beforehand.
 
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Old 09-03-05, 12:24 PM
underwood
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Thanks a lot! I've got all I need now.
 
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Old 09-05-05, 09:49 PM
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Get a pressure-balanced shower mixer with integral stops. That should satisfy everyone. I like the Moen 3189 for that, unless you want something higher end.
 
 

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