Trenchless Sewer Line


  #1  
Old 09-19-05, 10:47 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 44
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Trenchless Sewer Line

Ok heres the scoup, bought a house and wasnt in it 24 hours when we discovered our sewer was blocked up, so we called someone to check it out and found we had Orange Berg lines that had roots and were collpasing by the street. Called to get estimates and found a company here in Ohio that does the Trenchless lines. Anyone have them or had them done what are the pros and cons. To me saving on the landscaping and digging I am in favor of, but it isnt the same as the traditional way. Any comments and/or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 09-19-05, 02:08 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,002
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Trenchless sewer lines

Need more information. Don't know what they are proposing, I don't know how they are going to replace a sewer line without a trench?
 
  #3  
Old 09-19-05, 02:46 PM
wrmiii's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: West Texas
Posts: 245
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Dont do it!

Discobrian: In my part of the country a trench less sewer line consists of a membrane that is pulled through the existing line. It is pressured up and injected with a high temperature water which in turn will catalyze the membrane. This basically puts a liner on the inside of your old pipe. I could only recommend this for a system that was collapsing on its own due to age. Orange Burg is notorious about collapsing due to roots. The system described will not expand this material back in shape. Any collapsed area would have to be excavated and replaced. Although you would prefer the trench less procedure I think in this case it would be wise to just dig it up and install new pipe. And short of inconvenient, the trench less system generally runs about fifteen to twenty percent more in cost. Good luck, and post back with your decision.
 
  #4  
Old 09-19-05, 03:14 PM
plumguy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
There is obviously different methods. Go to Roto Rooters website they have a short video on their procedure. I personally don't have any experience or feedback, however it is clever and interesting and I'm sure it's not cheap.
 
  #5  
Old 09-19-05, 03:16 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 44
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The way it was explained it is nothing that expands, what happens is they run a cable through the existing line, they then pull that cable from the other end with an anvil typr device which breaks apart the current line and on the back of that anvil like thing is where they pull 20 foot sections of PVC or whatever that is called and they fuse together those joints. I have seen it online, but I can't remember where. This process is not well known yet, but they have been doind it for awhile in the Columbus area of Ohio and throughout their company. The company is Rescue Rooter owned by Servicemaster. Hope that helps explain.
 
  #6  
Old 09-19-05, 03:22 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 44
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Plumguy that is exactly the service they said. The price is pretty close to the same as digging it up if you factor in the fact of re-landscaping and planting of the lawn. In my case I was quoted $4700 to run a little over 100 feet, but the only hole they have to make is a 6' by 6' by 6' hole at the lower corner of my driveway. I had another estimate just to dig and replace for about $3500, so is it more expensive, yes and no like I said above about the landscaping and such, plus if they had to dig I would lose a deck and some mature bushes.
 
  #7  
Old 09-19-05, 04:21 PM
notuboo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Kansas City MO
Posts: 1,699
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Look up pipe bursting...

There will be a hole where the new line ties into the city sewer. This work does not work all the time as problems do arise.

This is a great idea for what is being done. I know some guys who make serious money with this process. They seem to be always busy, so the system does work.
 
  #8  
Old 09-19-05, 04:50 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 44
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yeah the biggest issue with this method not working is when there is a fully collapsed line. Mine is close but not fully collapsed, had camera in it yesterday and found the collapsing.
 
  #9  
Old 09-19-05, 05:06 PM
Hellrazor's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Eastern USA
Posts: 948
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Also, depending on the disclosure laws in your state, you should be able to go back after the previous owner for the cost of repairing this. I'd be on the phone with your realtor ASAP.
 
  #10  
Old 09-19-05, 05:57 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 44
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yeah I have already been on the phone and the seller is trying to say they didnt notice a problem which I think is BS. My agent wants estimates and so far I had a guy get pissed that another one came to do an estimate while he was there and left without an estimate, I didn't schedule them they said they would come out when they had a chance. I don't want to have the lawn dug up, but I bet the seller is gonna want the cheapest one if they even agree to pay, if they don't I hear I might have to take them to small claims court for the amount. Should the decision on what sewer line I want installed be made by me or the amount the seller is willing to pay??? I would say it should be mine and mine alone, but you never know. It sucks to be in this jam not being in the freakin house longer than 2 days. There is only 1" clearance on the main as it exits the house. If I get nowhere I feel I should consult a lawyer, but I can't wait to decide what to put in, it needs to be done this week.
 
  #11  
Old 09-19-05, 07:05 PM
X
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: denver
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
same story but on the other side

I'm sorry for your sewer trouble. we are under contract tosell our 100 year old denver brick bungalow. our plumbing works perfectly, yet the hydro-physic pipe inspection just showed us a break in the out pipe somewhere before it reaches the sewer main. so while your seller may be screwing you, it's possible that everything did work fine before.
 
  #12  
Old 09-20-05, 04:30 PM
Hellrazor's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Eastern USA
Posts: 948
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
A break in a line and a collapsed line are 2 different beasts.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: