No-twist PVC or No-hub


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Old 09-27-05, 12:29 PM
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No-twist PVC or No-hub

If one were to replace a PVC elbow in-line, one can only "push & twist" (to evenly spread the cement) on one of the sides of the elbow.

When faced with this challenge, do you pros out there just forgo twisting both sides, and hope that the no-twisted side seals up tight, or should one use a no-hub on the side in which you are unable to twist in the cement?

TIA
 
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Old 09-27-05, 02:04 PM
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PVC glue is a quick acting solvent that dissolves the plastic then allows it to re-solidify quickly. Twisting the pipe helps ensure an even distribution of dissolved plastics/solvent in the joint. When faced with your situation, I try to make sure I slide the pipe in and out of the fitting at least 1/4inch during final assembly. The idea is to spread the solvent/dissolving plastic to ensure a good weld.
 
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Old 09-27-05, 02:09 PM
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Cement

Edgar: Simple yet complicated question. (I like those) First of all, most of us pros do not follow the manufactures recommendation for solvent weld piping. Not that we are not good at what we do, just this thing about guys reading instructions. I have not met one plumber that will let a system set for twenty four hours after the completion of the last joint. (Manufacturers recommendation) The manufacturer also states that the cement should be applied while the primer is still wet on the material being joined. Here again, this is not always the case. The situation you described is not uncommon and easily completed just as you described. Just make sure you apply ample primer to the fitting and pipe, while still wet apply your glue. Hold the fitting in place for a bit to let it set. I will not go into the molecular reaction between the two chemicals (unless your just interesting in reading a short novel) but will assure you that the joint will be just fine and withstand any testing required by code. As for making up one side of the connection with a no-hub or any other similar fitting I would suggest against it. Depending on the location of the fitting and the use of dissimilar materials in one system it is generally not allowed by code. Just for kicks you should read the instructions manufactures post on these chemicals. If you follow them to the letter, a three hour job now takes three days. And last but certainly not least “Do not ingest the contents of this container” Manufacturers recommendation.
 
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Old 09-27-05, 02:24 PM
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PVC joints

Just about all of the post from wrmiii is right on the money. Don't sweat your scene, it will work like a charm. Lots of luck.
 
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Old 09-27-05, 03:05 PM
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LOL, thanks for the feedback.

I agree with you guys... plus I think the no-hubs inline with PVC/PVC look kind of bush league.

Thanks and have a good one.
 
 

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