Prevent Pipes from freezing?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-09-05, 07:26 PM
Bubba Bob
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Prevent Pipes from freezing?

Hello,

This is our first winter in our new home. Its an older home. THe foundation is on blocks and the cast iron pipes are under the house.

Living in apartments and Texas most my life ive never had to worry about it, but
now im not sure what do to. Most people say just let your pipes drip. Well, while others see water, all i see is money coming out of the faucet. Whats a safe temp. to let the faucets drip?

Also, unless it gets real cold, I leave the heaters OFF at night and during the day. The computer room and living room are the only rooms that usually get heated. On rare occasions we will heat the kitchen.

Cold house + cold outside = ?????

Again, at what outside temps should i let my faucets drip?

THanks

EDIT:

Also, when i say "freeze", I mean freeze + burst.

Do cast iron pipes even run the risk of bursting?

EDIT 2:

On a second note. Ive been dripping them if it gets into the 20s. However, with this last cold blast it got into the teens two nights in a row with a high of 33 the day in between. I didnt let the pipes drip once.

I now feel better about not letting the pipes drip at all, but on the other hand i may have been flirting with danger.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-09-05, 08:24 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,827
If you have cast iron pipes, these are the drain lines. Water lines are usually galvanized steel, copper or some type of plastic. It has been in the low 20's where I live but I know my crawlspace maintains an "above freezing" temperature. My walls are also well insulated so I don't worry about pipes freezing. These are the things you have to know about if you have thoughts about the pipes freezing. I have owned houses where the pipes were in a basement but the walls had little insulation and that is where the pipes froze. Kitchens are usually the worst due to the fact most sinks are under a window on an outside wall. This puts the piping close to the outside temps. I don't like paying for water that is going down the drain either, but, I sure don't want to be opening up walls to thaw out a frozen or worse yet, busted water line. Water expands when it freezes. This is why the lines break when frozen. Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 12-12-05, 04:26 PM
Bubba Bob
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks Dragon.

THe house has been added onto. Their is another room on the other side of the kitchen now, so i guess those pipes are safe?

I guess my main consern is the pipes going to the bathroom on the other end of the house and the outside spickets.

I guess ya wouldnt happen to know how cold it gets under a house would ya?
 
  #4  
Old 12-12-05, 11:20 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,827
Well, not exactly. With the vents closed and no openings to permit a lot of cold air influx plus no insulation on the floors above, the crawl will stay reasonably warm. But thats MY house.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes