Water Pressure Gauge

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Old 12-13-05, 02:22 PM
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Water Pressure Gauge

I want to install a pressure gauge so I can monitor the water pressure in my home. What type should I get and what's the best place to put it.

The only places inside the house wher it would be easily accessible would be at a toilet fill valve or in the cabinet under a sink. Would one of these locations give an adequate reading?

Maybe I should go for the water heater inlet, but that's under the house and would be a pain to go and look at.

Thanks, Joe
 
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Old 12-13-05, 03:53 PM
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Pressure gage

It depends on what you are trying to do, pressure will change with location. Wherever you put it will give a reading at that point. If you are trying to check the incoming pressure you have to put the gage as close to the meter as possible. A standard gage should be fine [10 to 15 bucks] buy a gage that reads approx 1/3rd. more than the pressure that you are looking for. Best that I can do with your info.
 
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Old 12-13-05, 03:58 PM
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Actually, the pressure reading will not change within your house unless it is running. If all faucets, sillcocks etc.. are off, the pressure will be the same in all part of your house. (It will be slightly different on different floors, but you will not be able to see that).

You can put the gauage in line with a shutoff in the kitchen or bathroom supply. Just need to be a tee that matches to the connections you require.
 
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Old 12-14-05, 05:59 AM
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There are some houses in my area where the architect/builder has used old or uncommon water pressure gages as art, using more than one gage in some areas! Sometimes sculpting a plumbing "tree" out of copper, with different gages coming off at different points. Watch the pressure change when you turn on the water or when you are running the water and somebody flushes the toilet. Why not add some temperature gages as well.
Make life interesting!
 
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Old 12-14-05, 11:42 AM
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Pressure gage

Originally Posted by cgar
Actually, the pressure reading will not change within your house unless it is running. If all faucets, sillcocks etc.. are off, the pressure will be the same in all part of your house. (It will be slightly different on different floors, but you will not be able to see that).

You can put the gauage in line with a shutoff in the kitchen or bathroom supply. Just need to be a tee that matches to the connections you require.
I have to take exception to this post. Pressure will change with elevation and friction. The original post didn't say why he wanted to monitor his pressure, it does make a difference
 
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Old 12-14-05, 01:48 PM
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Pressure will change with elevation, (which I indicated) but it will not be noticeable from what was indicated (crawl space or bathroom). Friction has absolutely nothing to do with pressure, unless you are trying to measure pressure while the water is running. The pressure will then depend on flow rate at which the water is running.
 
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Old 12-15-05, 03:18 PM
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Reason for Pressure Gauge

First I want to thank all who replied.

My reasons are as follows:

1. Pressure regulators don't last forever and it's nice to know if the pressure gets too high, possibly detrimental to fixtures, etc.

2. Low pressure can indicate plumbing lines blocked with scale.

3. Water companies sometimes increase or decrease street pressure and this can effect the performance of fixtures within the house - again, particularly if the pressure regulator needs to be repaired or replaced.

4. Hot water lines may have drastically lower pressures if there is scale buildup - or the WH is shot.

I've found that a pressure regulator will fail sooner or later, depending on the quality of water.

Basically, I just think it's a good idea to have one or more gauges to be able to monitor the health of the system. We do it with all sorts of equipment, but for some reason this has never become a standard part of home design.

I'm going to do it with all of my properties - I bet it'll be a lot easier to spot a problem before it gets too big.

Thanks again, Joe
 
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Old 12-16-05, 03:28 AM
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Just want to make sure you understand one very common misunderstanding with house pressure. When people have flow rate problems they usually refer to this a pressure problem. For example, I turn the water on and it only comes out a trickle or the shower does not feel as invigorating as before, etc..

This problem in more cases than not is a flow rate problem. When the water is not running, you could have a pressure reading right were it should be. To take it to an extreme, if yuo had a pin hole opening in a pipe only, the pressure past the pin hole would still end up registering the same pressure as before this pin hole as long as the water was stopped. Once the water is opened, the flow of water past the pin hole is very small so it comes out of faucet as a trickle. This is not a pressure problem but a flow problem.

You could try messuring the pressure when the water is flowing, but there are way to many variables to have lots of meaning. For example, you need the exact flow rate to compare one measurement to another, you need to know what pressure everything is being supplied to, etc...

Just another example. When you put your thumb over a garden hose, the water shoots farther. Your thumb is not changing the pressure of the water but rather restricting the flow. You will get a certain flow rate out of the hose. When you decrease the opening, the flow rate remains constant, but since you decrease the opening, the velocity of the water increases. This flow rate is actually refered to "mass flow rate".
 
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Old 12-16-05, 08:59 AM
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I understand that perfectly. "Mass Flow Rate" is not "velocity" but "volume". IOW, the water coming out of the hose is attempting to maintain a constant volume and by restricting the opening it increases in velocity.

If pressure is measured at 2 different locations in the system (start and end of a line) the pressure differential should remain constant unless the line becomes restricted between the 2 locations. If that happens, the pressure differential will change drastically. Take your example of the hose but crimp it instead of putting your finger over the end - this results in virtually zero pressure past the crimp.

I don't expect the use of pressure gauges to be the perfect diagnostic tool, but used properly they should be pretty good.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 09:05 AM
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pressure and volume/flow... the two most misunderstood properties of hydraulics. the gauge is a good diagnostic tool if accurate data is logged over a period of time and under identical conditions. sink on /sink off, tub on / tub off, etc. otherwise it's just another fitting that can leak
 
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Old 12-16-05, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by flopshot
pressure and volume/flow... the two most misunderstood properties of hydraulics. the gauge is a good diagnostic tool if accurate data is logged over a period of time and under identical conditions. sink on /sink off, tub on / tub off, etc. otherwise it's just another fitting that can leak
ROFLOL !!!
 
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