Lead drain

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  #1  
Old 12-20-05, 07:58 AM
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Lead drain

I have a cast iron flange attached to a lead drain, which then attaches to a cast iron hub.

The flange is cracked and needs to be replaced. I called a plumber out who suggested cutting the lead in half, using a Fernco fitting, and running PVC to the flange.

Evidently that's a bad idea since the lead will compress and the fitting will leak.

I've been researching quite a bit and have come up with a few options:
a) have a plumber remove the lead drain and brass ferrule, and lead on a new CI drain and flange. (this plumber did not want to use molten lead though and instead would use a 'plastic lead')

b) cut the lead and brass out and use a 4"->3" donut to attach a PVC drain to the CI hub.

c) remove the lead drain from the brass ferrule and use a Fernco fitting to attach PVC to the brass ferrule. (not sure how to get all of the lead off the brass; will a standard 3"->3" Fernco coupling work on the brass ferrule?)
I have the exact same situation with my lav drain. Lead going to a brass ferrule and then into a CI hub. I'd like to remove the lead drains from both places while I have the floor and walls open.

The bathroom is in an 80 yr old house, and on the 2nd floor. I have complete access to the dwv through the floor and walls on the 2nd floor.

Thanks in adavance for the advice..

-Zach
 
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Old 12-20-05, 10:57 AM
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You can buy a donut that fits into the cast iron hub and also fits PVC pipe. Probably have to get it at a Plumbing Supply store. I believe they are made by the same company that makes Mission/no-hub couplings. Good luck.
 
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Old 12-20-05, 10:15 PM
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I would use a 4" Fernco donut and run in whatever material you like to a new flange, reducing after the donut, if you have to reduce at all. I would NOT use the plastic lead or lead wool.
 
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Old 12-21-05, 02:55 PM
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Lead Pipe

The only thing that I will add to the other posts is to get all the lead out while you have accsess, lead is a problem waiting to happen. Luck.
 
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Old 12-21-05, 03:13 PM
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Okay, so far it sounds like the donut is the way to go.

I was / am unsure about using one, as I've read comments by a plumber on another forum that alluded to donuts being unreliable and really only suitable for underground applications.

If anyone else has any additional comments, they would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Zach
 
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Old 12-21-05, 03:22 PM
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Hmmmm, thats an interesting concept. Trusting something underground (where you would not see it) but not above ground. Does that make sense? If properly installed, they are fine. Just make sure you don't pinch it. Good luck.
 
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Old 12-21-05, 09:56 PM
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I should mention that I would personally prefer a poured lead joint to the Fernco (not sure what Shacko has against lead). I haven't seen any failed Fernco donuts, but they can sometimes be difficult to install, esp into an older hub.
 
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Old 12-23-05, 12:47 PM
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Lead pipe

Shacko's problem with lead is that it becomes thin over time, the skill to repair is non-existent. Pack and pour [lead joints] most plumbers don't have a clue now-days how to do this. Stick with the modern method. Luck.
 
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Old 12-23-05, 01:16 PM
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Shacko, thats why us "old time" plumbers are still in demand. Nothing personal about the young guys (they have all the new technology) but sometimes you need the old guy to fix problems.
The water plant in Ohio has 16" lead joints in their piping. When one leaked, no one seemed to know how to fix it and replacing was not an option. I got it done even though I had to make a "running rope". Every decade of trade has their stories. We did it the " hard way" and now there are easy ways. We all do our job, thats all that matters. In 20 years, you will be saying the same thing. Even though you never walked through 10 feet of snow going to school. LOL.
 
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