washing machine drain connection


  #1  
Old 01-10-06, 07:01 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 150
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
washing machine drain connection

Hi,
Different question re: washing machine this time. New machine will be front loader so less water to discharge. My question is presently the pipe that the drain hose goes into is about 10inches of straight pipe then U joint, then a horizontal pipe(which I put on a down angle to house drain pipe. Is 10 inches of straight pipe enough, or should I add anothe 1 foot or more(?). I am afraid that when it drains water will shoot back up because of the shortness of the pipe. The pipe is 1 1/4" copper.
If I should put more pipe should I: sweat another section on of copper, or use one of those rubber connectors with clamps and attach a section of plastic pipe to it.
It's a shame I have a perfect picture of this but cannot post on here(no attachments).
If someone will tell me where I could send it, I would gladly send for an answer.
Thanks for bearing with me.
George
 
  #2  
Old 01-10-06, 08:24 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,813
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
You can go to a site like Photobucket and turn your picture into a link that you can post here. Photobucket is free. 10" of pipe will not work. At the minimum, you would have suds coming out of the pipe after the washer has drained. good luck and hope to see the pic.
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-06, 03:47 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 150
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
reply with URL

Hi,
Thanks for the Photobucket advice.
Hope this works-it'll show 2 pics of the present setup:

http://photobucket.com/albums/f400/geoss54/

Hope from this you can tell me how much pipe to add and whether to sweat it on or attach plastic pipe with a rubber connector. If sweating an extra length, would it be better to remove the staraight length that is there now, and then sweat on one complete longer one(avoid using another connector)
Thanks
George
 

Last edited by geoss; 01-11-06 at 11:20 AM. Reason: add a sentence
  #4  
Old 01-11-06, 07:29 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 55
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I believe the vertical pipe is called the "stand pipe". Not sure where you live, but in NJ, you have to make sure that the stand pipe:

1. length is between 18"(min) to 48" (max); and
2. must be above the water line of the washer (for example, if your washer water fill level is 40", the top of the stand pipe must be taller than 40"

To make your life easier, I would place the front load washer on a platform (buy or build on) and replace the stand pipe with a taller one (so that you don't have to lower the "P" trap).

In addition, I would strongly consider relocating that outlet!

I'm a fairly new to plumbing as well, so take my opinion with a grain of salt and check with your local plumbing inspector (they are very helpful).

Good luck.
 
  #5  
Old 01-12-06, 03:41 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 150
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
reply

I'm a bit confused/ By water fill level do you mean the height of where the hose attaches to the washer or the height of the water in the tub once it is filled? The mid point of the door is 22", and I don't believe the water level in the tub would be above that. I just measured and if I add 12" of standpipe it would make thwe stand pipe 24" from the bottom of the "P" trap. Also it would put the top of the standpipe 48" above the midpoint of the front load.
Hope I worded everything right.
Thanks for the observation of the outlet. I noticed that and was going to move it. Just moved here to take care of my dad, and he never bothered.
George
p.s. Is there any problem with putting the outlet 6" or so from the iron pipe that brings the gas down to the dryer. This is a good distance away from any "possible" water.
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-06, 06:22 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 55
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Since I am a novice myself, I don't want to lead you down the road.

Check out this thread about a similar situation:
link

I strongly recommend you contact your plumbing inspector to first to see what the code allows before doing any work.
 
  #7  
Old 01-13-06, 11:08 AM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,813
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I agree with checking local codes as they vary so much from place to place. The one thing I do not like about your hook-up is that it appears the washer drain hose completely fills the drainpipe. The drain then goes to the trap and main drainline. It would be possible to suck the trap dry by flushing a toilet since the washer drainline is not vented. You have made it a closed system by blocking any air in the washer drain. If this happened, sewer gas would then be able to enter the home through the washer. The reason for the height of the washer standpipe is that washers push a lot of water out when in the spin cycle.
 
  #8  
Old 01-13-06, 03:11 PM
shacko's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
Posts: 2,137
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Wash machine

1 1/4 is too small!!
 
  #9  
Old 01-18-06, 12:51 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 49
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
How would he make the washer drainpipe vented?
 
  #10  
Old 01-18-06, 01:04 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,813
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
By installing a tee/wye fitting in the drainline after the trap and going up above the washer height and connecting into the drainline the washer drain ties into. Vents are typically loops that join the drain in two places. One below (drain) and one above (vent).
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: