Pipe Flanges - How'd They Do That??


  #1  
Old 01-15-06, 05:23 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: CO
Posts: 582
Received 3 Upvotes on 3 Posts
Pipe Flanges - How'd They Do That??

I'm moving my hot, cold, and drain pipes over one stud space to accommodate a different style bathroom vanity. Had to remove a section of drywall, of course.

Now that I've terminated the pipes with valve fittings, it dawned on me - how the heck does one get those new decorative flanges one? Common sense tells me I have toL

1. Remove the sweat-to-thread fittings

2. Install caps on the pipe ends so I can have water pressure to the whole house

3. Install the drywall (any easy way to locate the pipe and drain holes in the drywall before I mount it?)

4. Remove the caps (therby probably burning the new drywall)

5. Install the flanges and beat them into the drywall

6. Install new sweat-to-valve fittings (probably burning the drywall again and burning the flanges)

7. Install valves

Or am I overlooking some easier way?
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-06, 10:47 PM
steve_gro's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 967
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I would normally stub out w/ caps, and come back after the finish & cut the caps off, slide the flange on, and then use a compression angle stop. If the stub-outs are a little long, you've got room to do that.
 
  #3  
Old 01-16-06, 05:14 AM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
You can make a template out of a piece of cardboard. Take measurements from the closest edge of the drywall and up from the floor. Mark these on the cardboard. Cut the proper size holes and try it. If it fits, transfer to drywall using the template. If not, adjust the placement of holes.
I use 2 pieces of sheet metal with "U" shaped slots in them for soldering close to drywall. Make the slots just big enough to fit the pipe. Slide one on from one side/top and the other from the opposide side/bottom of the pipe. Solder and then slide sheet metal off the pipe. You can do this after the escutcheons (flanges) are in place. The escutcheons are held in place by friction, not pounded into the wall.
 
  #4  
Old 01-16-06, 06:13 AM
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: KY/OH
Posts: 3,362
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I use the plastic chrome scussions that have a split in them to snap over the pipe, they never rust or lose their looks.

They also make a hinged scussion but those are chromed metal and those will tarnish/distort over time. Never was fond of these.

The ones above I mention are around $1.48 a piece and you can install them on any existing valved supply line.
 
  #5  
Old 01-21-06, 02:49 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: CO
Posts: 582
Received 3 Upvotes on 3 Posts
Originally Posted by steve_gro
I would normally stub out w/ caps, and come back after the finish & cut the caps off, slide the flange on, and then use a compression angle stop. If the stub-outs are a little long, you've got room to do that.
Thanks Steve,

What's a compression angle stop?
 
  #6  
Old 01-21-06, 03:01 PM
majakdragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N.E. Arkansas
Posts: 7,475
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I have included a link with pictures of variou stop valves. Just click on the link. Number 14 is a Threaded angle stop. has female threads to screw onto a male pipe adapter. Number 16 is the same type stop but is for sweating onto your copper pipe. Number 20 is a compression stop. Slide onto pipe and tighten the nut and your done. good luck.

http://doityourself.com/shop/stopvalvesstandard.htm
 
  #7  
Old 01-25-06, 07:24 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: CO
Posts: 582
Received 3 Upvotes on 3 Posts
Originally Posted by majakdragon
I have included a link with pictures of variou stop valves. Just click on the link. Number 14 is a Threaded angle stop. has female threads to screw onto a male pipe adapter. Number 16 is the same type stop but is for sweating onto your copper pipe. Number 20 is a compression stop. Slide onto pipe and tighten the nut and your done. good luck.
Guess I've been erroneously referring to them over the years as "gate valves" or "shut-off valves". Thanks for your reply and link.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: