Gas Range pipe


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Old 02-04-06, 06:02 PM
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Gas Range pipe

Hello,
I was wanting to know what is the usual height and location of the pipe behind a gas range, also how high is the shut off usually placed? If I run 1/2 inch black through the floor from the crawl space, is it ok if it comes up right behind the range? Will this prevent the stove from being pushed in all the way? Thanks for the help in advance. This is a new construction and I want it to be right. One note, this is for LP gas.
Thanks
 

Last edited by jesspen; 02-04-06 at 06:28 PM.
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Old 02-05-06, 07:36 AM
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Having black iron pipe coming through the floor behind the range shouldn't pose a problem, I would check with local code first. Some code's require the shut off be in a cabinet adjacent to the range.

When it's piped through the floor, the best place for the shut off is usually at floor level. You can then come right off the shut off with a stainless flex-connector.
 
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Old 02-05-06, 07:55 AM
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Cool

May I suggest that 30-36" up from the floor is more practical?


1. This is the level at which many stoves connect. So the flex connector reaches farther.

2. The valve is accessible just by moving the stove forward just a little if at all.

3. It is easier to hook up the flex connector standing than sitting or stooping in a cramped space behind a stove.
If the stove is boxed in on both sides, it really matters.
 
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Old 02-05-06, 10:02 AM
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The problem is that there is no standard for where the gas connects to a stove. Get the rough-in sheet for the range you are planning to use.

If you bring the pipe up through the floor, that will of course prevent most ranges from going back flush to the wall. That is why the gas pipe is usually installed in the wall and brought out at the appropriate pipe.
 
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Old 02-05-06, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by 594tough
The problem is that there is no standard for where the gas connects to a stove. Get the rough-in sheet for the range you are planning to use.

If you bring the pipe up through the floor, that will of course prevent most ranges from going back flush to the wall. That is why the gas pipe is usually installed in the wall and brought out at the appropriate pipe.
So true! There is no standard which makes piping for the appliance prior to seeing it very difficult. In my experience, most ranges leave approx. a foot or so from the floor up for the stub/shutoff/etc as the connection is usually on the bottom, behind the warming/storage draw. Anything higher will prevent the range from going against the wall.

Some of the more exotic ranges leave only about a square foot on the bottom for it's connections. I honestly don't understand what these manufacturers are thinking in designing these things. At the same point, customers insist on having the gas line in place prior to seeing the range and after the wall is sheet rocked. Then it's your fault when the thing doesn't fit right. OK, I'm done ranting.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 11:07 AM
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One thing you can be sure that the manufacturers aren't thinking about is the installer. To have an accessible gas valve and have the range go all the way back against the wall can take some planning. Often we'll pipe into an adjacent cabinet, put the valve there, then back into the wall & out behind the range & flex from there. The valve is not considered accessible if you have to move the range to get to it (not even a 'little bit').

Getting the specs on the range and piping to it is the best idea.
 

Last edited by steve_gro; 02-12-06 at 11:37 PM.
 

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