Leak in Water Mains


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Old 02-08-06, 02:41 PM
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Exclamation Leak in Water Mains

I have a leak in the water mains somewhere between the water meter and the houses. The main line tees off and goes to the main house and also to a in-laws quarters in the back. My bill more than doubled from $80 to $200. If I shut off the valve to both the houses, I still see the needle moving. The shut-off valve for the main house is in the basement. Area around the walls is all concrete. I do not have a clue as to how the pipe is routed to the back house. Had a leak detection company come out and do a leak test, no luck. I was told the leak is too small to be detected. The house was built in 1995. Anybody has any ideas as to how I can isolate the leak to one of the two "legs". Where do u start???? Are there any companies there that can trace underground water pipes??? :nfunny:
 
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Old 02-08-06, 03:32 PM
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really teed off

Originally Posted by rookie06
I have a leak in the water mains somewhere between the water meter and the houses. The main line tees off
There's your leak!


> I do not have a clue as to how the pipe is routed to the back house.
Had to be on the builder's blueprint. Surely the city or the water authority has a copy.


> I was told the leak is too small to be detected.
How did they test? Look for mud in the yard?



> Anybody has any ideas as to how I can isolate the leak to one of the two "legs". Where do u start????

Dig up the tee.


> Are there any companies there that can trace underground water pipes???

Sure. What is the piping material?


Shut off the supply at the meter. Open the pipe in your basement and drain the water.
A fish tape or tape measure will give you distance to the tee. You should be able to see the angle of entry. Some 1/2" cpvc can be used to probe for any fittings near your house. Angle and distance tells you where to dig.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 03:40 PM
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You should have had a continuous line from the meter to the house, and a continuous line from the house to the carriage house.

If you end up doing a lot up digging, I suggest that you re-do it this way.
 
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Old 02-14-06, 08:58 PM
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Valves are not always 100%. You might check your toilets. Make sure that the water level in the tank is below the overflow (the correct level is usually marked on the inside of the tank. If not, set it to 1" below the overflow. If you can't get it right, replace the fill valve), and by putting food coloring in the tank; if it seeps into the bowl, replace the flapper & try again.

It's easy to check, and worthwhile whether you have a leak in the main or not (which you may have; hard to tell from here). It's very common for a sudden increase in water usage to be caused by faulty toilet parts.

As far as the water pipe routing, think of it from the standpoint that you were going to do the digging. You wouldn't want to do any more than necessary.

What kind of pipe & how far down?
 
 

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