Clogged Outdoor Drain


  #1  
Old 02-12-06, 02:13 PM
Ron999
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Clogged Outdoor Drain

I have a drain which is right outside the backdooor to my basement. And it's clogged, broken, or what, I don't know? When it rains hard water comes into the basement under the door.

I rented an electric snake yesterday and tried to solve the problem. I was able to get the snake in there about 30 feet and then it would go no further. In fact, when I pulled the snake out, a rock was caught in the snake head fitting.

I put a water hose with a balloon on the tip in there also, and tried to clear the pipe, to no avail.

It appears to me that the drain does not drain at all. Not slowly, but not at all. I never looked closely in there before this weekend. But it's filled to the top now, and has not drained at all in 24 hours.

House was built in 1939. And I bought it six months ago.

I'd like to know what my options are at this point? My basement is unfinished, so it's not a huge deal that water is getting in there; for now.

But I would like to fix the problem.

Thanks for any advice.

Ron
 
  #2  
Old 02-12-06, 04:36 PM
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If you feel you have explored all options and effectively attempted to clear the drain, then the only option at this point is to locate which direction the pipe goes, dig it up and replace where it has collapsed.
 
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Old 02-12-06, 06:20 PM
Ron999
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digging it up

Thanks moderator.
Yes, I suppose I knew that I was going to have to dig it up. Was hoping to hear of a miracle drain clear method here, I guess.

The pipe appears to head in a south direction, along the rear of the house.
I can't be sure though. My concern is that the pipe may head in an east direction, since my lot slopes in an east direction. And that means it could go right under the house. They wouldn't have put the pipe under the house, would they?
And what's the best way for me to find out exactly which way the pipe goes?
 
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Old 02-12-06, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Ron999
The pipe appears to head in a south direction, along the rear of the house.
I can't be sure though. My concern is that the pipe may head in an east direction, since my lot slopes in an east direction. And that means it could go right under the house. They wouldn't have put the pipe under the house, would they?
It could go under the house.
But it is more likely that the drain was added after the house was built.

Measure in a 30' radius to get an idea of the possibilites. Something likely might attract you attention.
To where could the pipe have drained? Did it go to daylight down the hill?

Can the previous owner be contacted?



And what's the best way for me to find out exactly which way the pipe goes?
Another option entirely is a camera service.

The cameraman could snake in a camera that would show you not only which way the pipe goes, but what the obstruction is.

Otherwise, you dig down every so often to find and follow it.



Water flooding the basement is always a problem.
 
  #5  
Old 02-13-06, 01:02 AM
Ron999
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drain

Well I know for a fact that the sewer line runs east, to the street. I've seen a drawing of all the sewer lines on my street. The only question is whether this particular storm drain pipe runs under the house, or runs south for a bit before making a left turn, and heading due east, to the street. It does not run to daylight. And the previous owner cannot be contacted.

I have a plumber coming tomorrow. I may have him do a camera inspection.

Doing research, I've come across another plumber in my area that uses pipebursting. I'm interested in that. Anyone have an opinion on that?
 
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Old 02-13-06, 02:53 AM
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In order for a plumber to do a camera inspection the piping must be clear of all waste. Pipe bursting could work but doesn't offer the insurance of pipe replacement.
 
  #7  
Old 02-13-06, 03:54 PM
Ron999
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storm drain

Well, I just had a plumber out. And he said that because the pipe had no trap, it was his opinion that the pipe just ran out into the yard, or somewhere. He said in my neighborhood there is no separate strom drainage system, and that storm drain pipes connect to the sewer system. And so it would need a trap. So no trap, means it does not connect to the sewer.
So he suggested putting in a sump pump, or just plain extending the roof over that door entry to prevent water collecting down there.
It's not a lot of water we're talking about, so perhaps I'll just extend the roof over?
 
 

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