washing machine drain options


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Old 02-25-06, 12:06 PM
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washing machine drain options

I want to move my washer to an area that has no drain pipe in the floor. There is however the house main 4" pipe and a 2" pipe for the kitchen sink overhead. My question is can I just tap the washer discharge into one of these pipes and use a check valve? I really don't want to trench about 18 ft into the concrete floor just for the washing machine.

What are my options?
Thanks,
 
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Old 02-25-06, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve Jags
can I just tap the washer discharge into one of these pipes and use a check valve?
No. A clothes washer can pump up about 4 feet. After that you are overworking the pump.
You can discharge into another tank and pump it from there.
But gravity is the best way.

The easiest option is just don't move the washer.
 
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Old 02-25-06, 07:40 PM
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I heard the newer machines can pump up to 10 feet high. I just need to know if the check valve setup would be ok.
 
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Old 02-25-06, 09:19 PM
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I heard the newer machines can pump up to 10 feet high.
Do you recall where you heard?


> I just need to know if the check valve setup would be ok.
I don't see why you would want one. How much water are you talking about?
An 1.25" line 10' long holds only 5 pints.

A check valve is just something else to go bad. It will clog with lint and not close anyway.
So if your system depends on a working check valve, it won't last very long.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 01:24 PM
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So I could hook it up with out the check valve?
 
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Old 02-26-06, 02:05 PM
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If you decide to go this route, you still need a trap in the drainline and a vent. If you do not install a vent, when other fixtures are used, the trap will get sucked out and sewer gas will enter your house. Good luck.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 03:43 PM
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So I could hook it up without the check valve?
You could. Either way it won't work.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 07:07 PM
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Think about the check valve method. If that check valve were to fail or even to not close fully, your "black" water, containing all sorts of nasty stuff, could easily back up into your clothes washer. That would be something that I would not want to take a chance on. You should only connect the drain hose to a 2" standpipe that is at least 18" high.
If the main drain ("soil stack") is near the ceiling, it doesn't sound like you can use that method.
BTW, probably 10 years ago or so, I called GE tech support and asked if a washing machine could pump much higher than 4 or 5 feet, and the answer was that they could pump to at least 10 ft. high.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 08:07 PM
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> If that check valve were to fail or even to not close fully

I don't know why you wrote "if".
It's a matter of when it does fail.


> If the main drain ("soil stack") is near the ceiling

Okay, so he could pump it up under his kitchen sink, put in an air gap, a standpipe, a trap, a vent, and tee it into the main.

If it were a perfect world, clothes wouldn't get dirty. Maybe they wouldn't even be ne...


> I called GE tech support and asked if a washing machine could pump
> much higher than 4 or 5 feet, and the answer was that they could
> pump to at least 10 ft. high.

Pump what? Water? Or sand?
I doubt that GE has some super pump or the hose would kick out of the standpipe or there would be more problems with drains not keeping up.

At 5', the flow is marginal for carrying high-density particles.
With 10' head I don't figure it can be fast enough to flush the sand through.
If the kids have a sandbox or he lives near the beach, the drain hose will have a pound or two of sand in it before long. Then the washer won't drain at all.

If there is a superpump for washers, though, let me know.

Perhaps I'll clamp a gauge onto one someday and see just what kind of pressure it can build.
Using a 3/4" diameter hose would help to keep the speed up if the pressure is available.

Definitely the drain cycle will run longer.
 
 

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