how do i rough in a bathroom sink


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Old 03-14-06, 03:38 PM
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how do i rough in a bathroom sink

the old bathroom sink and toilet had flared end pipes and no valves. i want the new bathroom to have 2 valves under the sink and 1 behind the toilet so i can shut the water off without closing the main downstairs.

i wamt to put those valves in right away so i can open the main shutoff downstairs and have water in the kitchen while i finish tearing out the old bathroom. i'm not tiling so i was thinking i could put the valves and it wouldn't be so hard to fit some greenboard around the valves after.

but i also got some extra caps. but if i cap the end of the line instead of putting a valve, can i heat the pipe again after, switch the cap for the valve.. or is that asking for trouble? i want everything to work and look right you know

here is a picture of the current bathroom plumbing. i bought pipe and all the fittings i need to put it back exactly the same.
http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3223/dscf12076dl.jpg

i also want to know why do the pipes to the sink keep rising higher after the T's that go to the faucet? i guess i'm going to do it the same way

is there a correct height where i should put a T and have the pipes coming out of the wall? they have different lengths of the braided water lines at the store but i want to do it right.

and how far should the copper pipe come out of the wall so i can make a clean fit with my valve? i'm going to put a sink with drawers and stuff but the one for the toilet will be showing so i want it to look right.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 07:26 PM
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> i'm not tiling so i was thinking i could put the valves and it wouldn't be so hard to
> fit some greenboard around the valves after.

Stubs are easier since the holes are smaller.


> i also got some extra caps. but if i cap the end of the line instead of putting a valve,
> can i heat the pipe again after, switch the cap for the valve.

Yes.

> why do the pipes to the sink keep rising higher after the T's that go to the faucet?

Shock absorbers. They are supposed to have air in them.


> i guess i'm going to do it the same way

Yes.

> is there a correct height where i should put a T and have the pipes coming out of the wall?

No.

> they have different lengths of the braided water lines at the store but i want to do it right.

The higher you put them, the shorter the supply lines.
But remember that you want to be clear of the bowl and drain/trap for ease of access.

> how far should the copper pipe come out of the wall so i can make a clean fit with my valve?

The farther the easier it is to work with. Give yourself 8". You can always cut it shorter later.


> the one for the toilet will be showing so i want it to look right.

In that case, probably 2". Is it a 90° valve? measure where your tank will be and line it up so the valve is under the center of the tank (front-to-back) and not at all to the left of the tank (your left as you face it).
 
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Old 03-14-06, 09:05 PM
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i will do it like that and give myself a few extra inches. i don't think i have the right valves anyway.

i did get all 90's. with a copper sweat inlet, and the out is male/threaded to connect with the braided supply line. i thought i would solder the valve right onto the copper pipe but i went and bought another plumbing book adn this book says to solder a threaded fitting onto the end of the copper pipe, then twist the valve on there.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by notacomputation
i don't think i have the right valves anyway.
The right valve has to be turned only 1/4 turn to go from ON to OFF.


> i did get all 90s with a copper sweat inlet, and the out is male/threaded
> to connect with the braided supply line.

most likely 3/8" male compression thread but could be 1/2" npt.


> i thought i would solder the valve right onto the copper pipe

Correct.


> but i went and bought another plumbing book and this book says to
> solder a threaded fitting onto the end of the copper pipe, then twist
> the valve on there.

That is entirely unnecessary if you got the correct valves (see above).

But take care when soldering not to overheat the valve itself.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 10:22 PM
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now i'm sure i've got the wrong ones

mine look like this
http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/3918/dscf12081rw.jpg

they take several turns to close.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 01:26 AM
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> now i'm sure i've got the wrong ones
> they take several turns to close.

Of course they will work... for a while.
But eventually they will cramp up and not close or they will leak.
I very much dislike them.

The bottom line is that someday you'll need to shut the water off in a big hurry and they won't work.

You want chrome angle ball valves with 1/2" copper sweat by 3/8" o.d. compression male.
Where I get mine they are a buck cheaper too.
 
 

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