House Trap


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Old 05-09-06, 05:47 PM
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House Trap

I had my outgoing sewer pipe re-routed out of the house for my remodel. In the process the guy took out the house trap, in the basement. (Said I didn't need it) Now I get loads of sewer stench in my yard--I can't even open the windows.

This trap was blocking the unusually great stench from the sewer main from going out my vent stack on the roof.

Their solution now is to put a house trap OUTSIDE, buried.

Does this seem like a reasonable solution?
My other question is how deep does it have to go to keep from freezing?
If frost level, what depth?
I live in central NJ. ( If we are lucky we might see temps at zero) Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 06:09 PM
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It's either that or a vent filter at the top of the vent. The house trap was obviously doing what it's supposed to; I would've been disinclined to remove it.

If you decide to re-install a house trap it will go inline with the existing lateral building drain, so I don't think you have much choice in how far down you put it. I don't know where the frost line is in your area, but perhaps another poster will be able to provide that info. I would hazard a guess of 3' or better.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 06:56 PM
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Actually I think you are correct on the 3ft. frost level. But the sewer line out to the street is not 3ft down.
--will I be more at risk with a trap that's avove this level?
Also a trap can probably go back in the house, it'll just be a bigger complication.
What would you do--house trap inside or house trap outside above the frost level?

Also, what is a vent filter? Will it eliminate all the odor? Does it have to be replaced periodically? Thanks.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 10:20 PM
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I've never had the occasion to use a vent filter, but I have heard many success stories about them. I would hope that they do not require much maintenance, as they're usually installed in an inconvenient location.

If you were to re-install the house trap, I would be inclined to locate it inside if that's possible- less danger of freezing. Knowing how far down the frost line is would be a handy bit information in this case.
 
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Old 05-10-06, 03:33 AM
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Originally Posted by steve_gro
If you were to re-install the house trap, I would be inclined to locate it inside if that's possible- less danger of freezing. Knowing how far down the frost line is would be a handy bit information in this case.
Frost level is down 3ft.
 
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Old 05-10-06, 10:15 AM
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If the frost level is down 3', but the lateral building drain is above that, I would think that the house trap would have a chance of freezing on a cold day.

How about calling back the plumber that took it out? If I took out a house trap (which I normally wouldn’t do) and it caused a problem, I would probably get a call-back; and address the issue accordingly.
 
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Old 05-10-06, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by steve_gro
How about calling back the plumber that took it out? If I took out a house trap (which I normally wouldn’t do) and it caused a problem, I would probably get a call-back; and address the issue accordingly.
Yep I did call him back. He talks much more than listens and initially suggested everything except putting the trap back in the house.
 
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Old 05-11-06, 10:04 AM
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House trap

I think that you have to call your local code office and see what they say about house traps, you can't pull them out without modifying the existing plumbing hook-ups. Where I live N,E. they were always inside the house, [They don't allow them any more]. You have to ask the plumber why he pulled it out. Luck.
 
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Old 05-11-06, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by shacko
you can't pull them out without modifying the existing plumbing hook-ups. . You have to ask the plumber why he pulled it out. Luck.
He took it out because he claimed that I didn't need it, and because it will be extensive complication to get it back in. Also the existing "hook-ups" became modified to accomplish the sewer pipe re-routing.
The understanding for my locale is that house traps are not required, but not illegal. The plumber is slated to put it back in the house.

Unrelated question: Is it possible to safely put a slight bend in 1/2" copper pipe--by hand or otherwise?
 

Last edited by Capt; 05-11-06 at 06:24 PM.
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Old 05-11-06, 08:50 PM
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It's ok to bend hard-drawn type L (blue) or K (green). Type M (red) will kink. Actually they all will if you aren't careful. Ridgid makes a nice bender; you can make a 180° with it.

As far as the house trap, you could call the local building department to see if they're required. If so, pass that along to the plumber that took it out & tell him to put it back (inside the house). If they are not required, you might try the vent filter. As I said earlier, I have not personally ever used one (we all happen to have house traps here) but I have heard many success stories about them. A call to the mfg would clarify the maintenance issue.
 
 

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